Presentations

    Factors That Make Peer Instruction Work: A 700-User Survey, at 2000 AAPT Winter Meeting (Kissimmee, FL), Tuesday, January 18, 2000:
    Peer Instruction, a teaching strategy in which lectures are interspersed with short, conceptual questions (""ConcepTests""), is used widely in introductory physics and other classes at the college and secondary school levels. Although anecdotal evidence suggests that many instructors achieve success, there has been no previous systematic study of the factors contributing to the effectiveness of Peer Instruction. We administered a comprehensive survey of nearly 700 Peer Instruction users worldwide, gathering data on implementation and outcomes in a wide variety of settings and institutions. We... Read more about Factors That Make Peer Instruction Work: A 700-User Survey
    Confusion: Students' Perception vs. Reality, at American Association of Physics Teachers Winter 2000 Meeting (Kissimmee, FL), Tuesday, January 18, 2000:
    Should an instructor be discouraged when students say ""I'm confused""? This is a crucial issue for educational reform, because students often report feeling more confused when they are asked to think more for themselves. We report on an analysis of the relationship between perceived confusion and understanding in introductory physics. We asked 200 students during one semester to indicate what, if anything, they found difficult or confusing in their pre-class reading assignment and correlated their responses to answers they provided on questions on corresponding topics. Preliminary results... Read more about Confusion: Students' Perception vs. Reality
    Can Students Evaluate Their Own Understanding?, at AAPT Summer Meeting (Syracuse, NY), Tuesday, July 25, 2006:
    Can students assess their own understanding in introductory physics? How does their assessment change during the learning process? Instructors often gauge how well students are assimilating the material based on the number of questions or confused looks they receive during their interactions with students. However, it is unclear how well students are able to recognize their own understanding (or lack thereof). In this talk, we present preliminary results from our study of the relationship between students' perceived understanding and their actual understanding of introductory physics concepts... Read more about Can Students Evaluate Their Own Understanding?
    Academic Physicists' Introductory Teaching Improvement Efforts at Major Research Universities, at American Association of Physics Teachers Summer Meeting 2010 (Portland, OR, USA), Saturday, July 17, 2010
    There is no shortage of PER literature describing research-based, instructional strategies for improving teaching in introductory college physics courses. [1] It remains, however, that most physics faculty with visions of improved teaching based on such strategies must overcome significant barriers, including a reward system structured to direct faculty attention toward research and away from pedagogy. [2] Barriers to teaching improvement are compounded at major research universities (MRUs), where science faculty must balance extreme demands for research productivity with their teaching... Read more about Academic Physicists' Introductory Teaching Improvement Efforts at Major Research Universities
    Researching Implementation of Instructional Change in the Advanced Physics Laboratory, at American Association of Physics Teachers Summer Meeting 2010 (Portland, OR, USA), Saturday, July 17, 2010
    Abstract Body: Although physics education research on the implementation of instructional change in introductory physics laboratories is on the rise, dissemination of research on such change in advanced undergraduate laboratory courses is still lagging. This gap presents a problem for faculty seeking to improve students’ learning in advanced laboratories by using research-based pedagogies. In this study, we analyzed interview, observational, and course data to investigate four instructional changes implemented for the first time in an advanced physics laboratory course at one major research... Read more about Researching Implementation of Instructional Change in the Advanced Physics Laboratory
    Assessing and Enhancing Student Learning in the Advanced Physics Lab, at AAPT Summer Meeting, 2010 (Portland, Oregon), Monday, July 19, 2010
    Efforts to reform instructional physics labs--by defining measurable goals and improving student learning--have led to several innovations (i.e. rubrics for enhanced formative assessment) at the introductory level. However, researchers have yet to explore similar innovations in advanced laboratory courses. In an effort to fill this void, we investigated the observable aspects of student learning, culled from submitted written work and discussions between students and faculty, in light of specific changes to the advanced lab course (clear statement of learning goals, better-defined activities... Read more about Assessing and Enhancing Student Learning in the Advanced Physics Lab
    An Evaluation of Effectiveness of Short Physics Workshops for In-service Teachers, at American Association of Physics Teachers Winter Meeting 2011 (Jacksonville, FL), Monday, January 10, 2011
    There is compelling evidence that Peer Instruction improves students’ ability to complete both conceptual and traditional computational physics problems. We used Peer Instruction during a four-week long (120 hours) retraining course for in-service teachers of grades 7-12 in Korea. The goal of this study is to investigate if Peer Instruction can be used to improve the participating teachers’ conceptual understanding of introductory physics concepts. To this end we pre- and post-tested the teachers using the Force Concept Inventory and The Conceptual Survey of Electricity and Magnetism.... Read more about An Evaluation of Effectiveness of Short Physics Workshops for In-service Teachers
    Researching Student and Faculty College Readiness Views—A Holistic Approach, at National Association of Developmental Education (Orlando, FL), Thursday, February 23, 2012:
    This session shares current research on college readiness, with supporting quantitative data from a national assessment on first-year expectations (Cooperative Institutional Research Program (CIRP)) and qualitative data from a UT-Austin survey of faculty and student perceptions of college readiness. Data will be used to strengthen the argument for a broader definition of college readiness to include cognitive strategies beyond content knowledge. Presenters will share data that outline first-year student college expectations and attitudes of their level of college preparedness. This data shows... Read more about Researching Student and Faculty College Readiness Views—A Holistic Approach
    Using pedagogical innovation to improve student success in first-year courses, at 2013 International HETL Conference, University of Central Florida (Orlando, FL, USA), Monday, January 14, 2013:
    Student retention is a higher education problem that penetrates diverse contexts, including institutional types, subject matter, and geographic region. Theories have historically linked increased retention rates to concepts such as campus involvement and institutional engagement (Tinto, 1993). Most higher education retention interventions thus focus on keeping students who are already at university, enrolled. Attrition is at its highest at the end of the first year of study (Tinto, 1993). One reason students drop out at this stage is because they are struggling academically in large,... Read more about Using pedagogical innovation to improve student success in first-year courses
    Using Partnerships to Scale Innovation: UT-Austin’s OnRamps Initiative, at TASA Midwinter Conference (Austin, TX), Wednesday, January 30, 2013:
    OnRamps is a statewide initiative organized by UT-Austin to accelerate students’ preparation for entry-level college courses. Three dual-credit courses are being developed by faculty at UT- Austin and other institutions for launch in fall 2013. This session focuses on how OnRamps has used strategic partnerships— with national experts, institutional and technological partners, and successful programs—to leverage expertise, as well as scale and support statewide innovation.
    Collaborative Knowledge Construction using an Online Annotation System, at 2016 International Conference of East-Asian Association for Science Education (Tokyo, Japan), Friday, August 26, 2016
    We studied the collaborative construction of knowledge facilitated by an online annotation system in a flipped class. Students used the online system to collaboratively annotate the pre-class reading assignments by asking questions, responding to questions, or placing comments. The annotation threads reveal the students’ knowledge structures. For example, asking questions (or answering them) exposes lack of knowledge or misconceptions that persist after the pre-class reading. At the same time, even just reading annotation threads without contributing to them can help spread knowledge.... Read more about Collaborative Knowledge Construction using an Online Annotation System