Presentations

    Flat space, deep learning, at Independent Schools Association of the Southwest (ISAS) Conference (Tulsa, OK), Monday, November 3, 2014:
    The teaching of physics to engineering students has remained stagnant for close to a century. In this novel team-based, project-based approach, we break the mold by giving students ownership of their learning. This new course has no standard lectures or exams, yet students’ conceptual gains are significantly greater than those obtained in traditional courses. The course blends six best practices to deliver a learning experience that helps students develop important skills, including communication, estimation, problem solving, and team skills, in addition to a solid conceptual understanding... Read more about Flat space, deep learning
    Flat space, deep learning, at Annual Meeting of the Team-based Learning Collaborative (St. Petersburg, FL), Friday, March 6, 2015:
    The teaching of physics to engineering students has remained stagnant for close to a century. In this novel team-based, project-based approach, we break the mold by giving students ownership of their learning. This new course has no standard lectures or exams, yet students’ conceptual gains are significantly greater than those obtained in traditional courses. The course blends six best practices to deliver a learning experience that helps students develop important skills, including communication, estimation, problem solving, and team skills, in addition to a solid conceptual understanding... Read more about Flat space, deep learning
    The scientific approach to teaching: Research as a basis for course design, at Ohio State Academy of Teaching Conference, Ohio State University (Columbus, OH), Friday, April 3, 2015:
    Discussions of teaching -- even some publications -- abound with anecdotal evidence. Our intuition often supplants a systematic, scientific approach to finding out what works and what doesn't work. Yet, research is increasingly demonstrating that our gut feelings about teaching are often wrong. In this talk I will discuss some research my group has done on gender issues in science courses and on the effectiveness of classroom demonstrations.
    Flat space, deep learning, at Interface 2015, University of Florida (Gainesville, FL), Friday, April 24, 2015:
    The teaching of physics to engineering students has remained stagnant for close to a century. In this novel team-based, project-based approach, we break the mold by giving students ownership of their learning. This new course has no standard lectures or exams, yet students’ conceptual gains are significantly greater than those obtained in traditional courses. The course blends six best practices to deliver a learning experience that helps students develop important skills, including communication, estimation, problem solving, and team skills, in addition to a solid conceptual understanding... Read more about Flat space, deep learning
    How the Mind Tricks Us: Visualizations and Visual Illusions, at Teaching Renewal Conference, University of Missouri-Columbia (Columbia, MO), Friday, February 27, 2004:
    Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning.
    Visualizations and visual illusions: how the mind tricks us, at Collaborative for Excellence in Teacher Preparation Conference, Clarion University (Clarion, PA), Wednesday, August 18, 2004:
    Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning.
    Visualizations and visual illusions: how the mind tricks us, at 2004 National Assembly of PKAL's Faculty for the 21st Century (Dallas, TX), Friday, October 15, 2004:
    Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning.
    Visualizations and visual illusions: how the mind tricks us, at OSA Optics in the South East Conference, University of North Carolina Charlotte (Charlotte, NC), Thursday, November 4, 2004:
    Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning.
    Visualizations and visual illusions: how the mind tricks us, at Lowell Regional Physics Alliance Meeting, University of Massachusetts Lowell (Lowell, MA), Thursday, November 18, 2004:
    Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning.
    Visualizations and visual illusions: how the mind tricks us, at 2006 Cottrell Scholars Meeting (Tucson, AZ), Friday, July 7, 2006:
    Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning.
    How the mind tricks us: visualizations and visual illusions, at International Conference on Technology in Collegiate Mathematics, Westin Copley Plaza (Boston, MA), Friday, February 16, 2007:
    Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning
    How the mind tricks us: visualizations and visual illusions, at Course on Frontier Developments in Optics and Spectroscopy, Centro Ettore Majorana (Erice, Italy), Monday, June 25, 2007:
    Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning
    The make-believe world of real-world physics, at AAPT 2008 Summer Meeting (Millikan Award lecture), University of Alberta (Edmonton, AB, Canada), Tuesday, July 22, 2008:
    That physics describes the real world is a given for physicists. In spite of tireless efforts by instructors to connect physics to the real world, students walk away from physics courses believing physicists live in a world of their own. Are students clueless about the real world? Or are we perhaps deluding ourselves and misleading our students about the real world?
    The scientific approach to teaching: Research as a basis for course design, at Nuevas Tendencias en la Enseñanza de la Física, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla (Puebla, Mexico), Saturday, September 19, 2009:
    Discussions of teaching -- even some publications -- abound with anecdotal evidence. Our intuition often supplants a systematic, scientific approach to finding out what works and what doesn't work. Yet, research is increasingly demonstrating that our gut feelings about teaching are often wrong. In this talk I will discuss some research my group has done on gender issues in science courses and on the effectiveness of classroom demonstrations.
    The scientific approach to teaching: Research as a basis for course design, at ICPE2009 (Bangkok, Thailand), Monday, October 19, 2009:
    Discussions of teaching -- even some publications -- abound with anecdotal evidence. Our intuition often supplants a systematic, scientific approach to finding out what works and what doesn't work. Yet, research is increasingly demonstrating that our gut feelings about teaching are often wrong. In this talk I will discuss some research my group has done on gender issues in science courses and on the effectiveness of classroom demonstrations.
    The scientific approach to teaching: Research as a basis for course design, at 2nd Annual DTI Spring Conference, Community College of Denver (Denver, CO), Friday, April 2, 2010:
    Discussions of teaching -- even some publications -- abound with anecdotal evidence. Our intuition often supplants a systematic, scientific approach to finding out what works and what doesn't work. Yet, research is increasingly demonstrating that our gut feelings about teaching are often wrong. In this talk I will discuss some research my group has done on gender issues in science courses and on the effectiveness of classroom demonstrations.
    The make-believe world of real-world physics, at Spring 2010 Meeting of the Chicago Section of the American Association of Physics Teachers, Chicago State University (Chicago, IL), Saturday, April 24, 2010:
    That physics describes the real world is a given for physicists. In spite of tireless efforts by instructors to connect physics to the real world, students walk away from physics courses believing physicists live in a world of their own. Are students clueless about the real world? Or are we perhaps deluding ourselves and misleading our students about the real world?
    The scientific approach to teaching: Research as a basis for course design, at 3rd Annual Conference of Educational Research Center (Brummana, Lebanon), Sunday, March 27, 2011:
    Discussions of teaching -- even some publications -- abound with anecdotal evidence. Our intuition often supplants a systematic, scientific approach to finding out what works and what doesn't work. Yet, research is increasingly demonstrating that our gut feelings about teaching are often wrong. In this talk I will discuss some research my group has done on gender issues in science courses and on the effectiveness of classroom demonstrations.

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