Presentations

    Nonlinear optics at the nanoscale, at University of Florida (Gainesville, FL), Monday, February 16, 2015:
    We explore nonlinear optical phenomena at the nanoscale by launching femtosecond laser pulses into long silica nanowires. Using evanescent coupling between wires we demonstrate a number of nanophotonic devices. At high intensity the nanowires produce a strong supercontinuum over short interaction lengths (less than 20 mm) and at a very low energy threshold (about 1 nJ), making them ideal sources of coherent white-light for nanophotonic applications. The spectral broadening reveals an optimal fiber diameter to enhance nonlinear effects with minimal dispersion. We also present a device that... Read more about Nonlinear optics at the nanoscale
    Wrapping light around a hair, at REU/RET Seminar, Harvard University (Cambridge, MA), Wednesday, June 30, 2004:
    Can light be guided by a fiber whose diameter is much smaller than the wavelength of the light? Can we mold the flow of light on the micrometer scale so it wraps, say, around a hair? Until recently the answer to these questions was ‘no’. We developed a technique for drawing long, free-standing silica wires with diameters down to 50 nm that have a surface smoothness at the atomic level and a very uniform diameter. Light can be launched into these silica nanowires by optical evanescent coupling and the wires allow low-loss single-mode operation. They can be bent sharply, making it possible to... Read more about Wrapping light around a hair
    Wrapping light around a hair, at IInd Mexican Meeting on Mathematical and Experimental Physics, Colegio Nacional (Mexico City, Mexico), Friday, September 10, 2004:
    Can light be guided by a fiber whose diameter is much smaller than the wavelength of the light? Can we mold the flow of light on the micrometer scale so it wraps, say, round a hair? Until recently the answer to these questions was ’no’. We developed a technique for drawing long, free-standing silica wires with diameters down to 50 nm that have a surface smoothness at the atomic level and a very uniform diameter. Light can be launched into these silica nanowires by optical evanescent coupling and the wires allow low-loss single-mode operation. They can be bent sharply, making it possible to... Read more about Wrapping light around a hair
    Wrapping light around a hair, at Physics Colloquium, University of Massachusetts Lowell (Lowell, MA), Wednesday, September 22, 2004:
    Can light be guided by a fiber whose diameter is much smaller than the wavelength of the light? Can we mold the flow of light on the micrometer scale so it wraps, say, around a hair? Until recently the answer to these questions was ‘no’. We developed a technique for drawing long, free-standing silica wires with diameters down to 50 nm that have a surface smoothness at the atomic level and a very uniform diameter. Light can be launched into these silica nanowires by optical evanescent coupling and the wires allow low-loss single-mode operation. They can be bent sharply, making it possible to... Read more about Wrapping light around a hair
    Wrapping light around a hair, at Physics Colloquium, University of Missouri-Rolla (Rolla, MO), Thursday, October 21, 2004:
    Can light be guided by a fiber whose diameter is much smaller than the wavelength of the light? Can we mold the flow of light on the micrometer scale so it wraps, say, around a hair? Until recently the answer to these questions was ‘no’. We developed a technique for drawing long, free-standing silica wires with diameters down to 50 nm that have a surface smoothness at the atomic level and a high uniformity of diameter. Light can be launched into these silica nanowires by optical evanescent coupling and the wires allow low-loss single-mode operation. They can be bent sharply, making it... Read more about Wrapping light around a hair
    Supercontinuum and second harmonic generation in amorphous silica nanowires, at Glass & Optical Materials Division Fall 2004 Meeting (Cocoa Beach, FL), Wednesday, November 10, 2004:
    We developed a technique for drawing long, free-standing silica nanowires with diameters down to 50 nm and lengths up to 40 mm. The wire core is amorphous and of very uniform diameter. The wire surface has atomic level smoothness. The wire can guide a single mode of visible or near-infrared light. Because the diameter of the fiber is smaller than the wavelength, however, a large portion of the guided light is in the form of an evanescent field surrounding the nanowire. When amplified femtosecond laser pulses are coupled into these wires, surprising nonlinear optical effects are observed: in... Read more about Supercontinuum and second harmonic generation in amorphous silica nanowires
    Subwavelength-diameter silica wires for microscale optical components, at SPIE Photonics West 2005 Conference (San Jose, CA), Monday, January 24, 2005:
    Optical components built from structures that are tens of micrometers wide are playing a key role in current optical communication networks, optical sensors, and medical optical devices. The demand for improved performance, broader applications, and higher integration density, together with rapid advances in nanotechnology for electronics and optoelectronics, has spurred an effort to reduce the size of basic optical components. However, the miniaturization of optical components with subwavelength and nanometer-sized optical guiding structures through established fabrication methods is... Read more about Subwavelength-diameter silica wires for microscale optical components
    Nanowiring light, at Optical Fiber Communication Conference 2005 (Anaheim, CA), Thursday, March 10, 2005:
    Recent advances in the fabrication and manipulation of sub-wavelength optical fibers provide new methods for building chemical and biological sensors, generating supercontinuum light by nonlinear pulse propagation, and constructing microphotonic components and devices.
    Wrapping Light around a Hair, at Applied Physics-OSA Optics Seminar, California Institute of Technology (Pasadena,), Thursday, March 10, 2005:
    Can light be guided by a fiber whose diameter is much smaller than the wavelength of the light? Can we mold the flow of light on the micrometer scale so it wraps, say, around a hair? Until recently the answer to these questions was ‘no’. We developed a technique for drawing long, free-standing silica wires with diameters down to 50 nm that have a surface smoothness at the atomic level and a high uniformity of diameter. Light can be launched into these silica nanowires by optical evanescent coupling and the wires allow low-loss single-mode operation. They can be bent sharply, making it... Read more about Wrapping Light around a Hair
    Wrapping light around a hair, at AP298r Course, Harvard University (Cambridge, MA), Wednesday, March 16, 2005:
    Can light be guided by a fiber whose diameter is much smaller than the wavelength of the light? Can we mold the flow of light on the micrometer scale so it wraps, say, around a hair? Until recently the answer to these questions was ‘no’. We developed a technique for drawing long, free-standing silica wires with diameters down to 50 nm that have a surface smoothness at the atomic level and a high uniformity of diameter. Light can be launched into these silica nanowires by optical evanescent coupling and the wires allow low-loss single-mode operation. They can be bent sharply, making it... Read more about Wrapping light around a hair
    Wrapping light around a hair: optical sensing at the nanoscale, at Working together: Research & Development Partnerships in Homeland Security (Boston, MA), Wednesday, April 27, 2005:
    Can light be guided by a fiber whose diameter is much smaller than the wavelength of the light? Can we mold the flow of light on the micrometer scale so it wraps, say, around a hair? Until recently the answer to these questions was ‘no’. We developed a technique for drawing long, free-standing silica wires with diameters down to 50 nm that have a surface smoothness at the atomic level and a high uniformity of diameter. Light can be launched into these silica nanowires by optical evanescent coupling and the wires allow low-loss single-mode operation. They can be bent sharply, making it... Read more about Wrapping light around a hair: optical sensing at the nanoscale
    Subwavelength-diameter silica wires for microscale optical components, at SPIE Europe International Symposium: Microtechnologies for the New Millennium (Sevilla, Spain), Tuesday, May 10, 2005:
    Optical components built from structures that are tens of micrometers wide are playing a key role in current optical communication networks, optical sensors, and medical optical devices. The demand for improved performance, broader applications, and higher integration density, together with rapid advances in nanotechnology for electronics and optoelectronics, has spurred an effort to reduce the size of basic optical components. However, the miniaturization of optical components with subwavelength and nanometer-sized optical guiding structures through established fabrication methods is... Read more about Subwavelength-diameter silica wires for microscale optical components
    Wrapping light around a hair, at Harvard Crimson Summer Academy Meeting, Harvard University (Cambridge, MA), Wednesday, July 13, 2005:
    Can light be guided by a fiber whose diameter is much smaller than the wavelength of the light? Can we mold the flow of light on the micrometer scale so it wraps, say, around a hair? Until recently the answer to these questions was ‘no’. We developed a technique for drawing long, free-standing silica wires with diameters down to 50 nm that have a surface smoothness at the atomic level and a high uniformity of diameter. Light can be launched into these silica nanowires by optical evanescent coupling and the wires allow low-loss single-mode operation. They can be bent sharply, making it... Read more about Wrapping light around a hair
    Wrapping light around a hair: manipulating light at the nanoscale, at Physics Colloquium, University of Washington (Seattle, WA), Monday, October 10, 2005:
    Can light be guided by a fiber whose diameter is much smaller than the wavelength of the light? Can we mold the flow of light on the micrometer scale so it wraps, say, around a hair? Until recently the answer to these questions was ‘no’. We developed a technique for drawing long, free-standing silica wires with diameters down to 50 nm that have a surface smoothness at the atomic level and a high uniformity of diameter. Light can be launched into these silica nanowires by optical evanescent coupling and the wires allow low-loss single-mode operation. They can be bent sharply, making it... Read more about Wrapping light around a hair: manipulating light at the nanoscale
    Wrapping light around a hair: optics at the nanoscale, at Physics Colloquium, Arizona State University (Tempe, AZ), Thursday, October 13, 2005:
    Can light be guided by a fiber whose diameter is much smaller than the wavelength of the light? Can we mold the flow of light on the micrometer scale so it wraps, say, around a hair? Until recently the answer to these questions was ‘no’. We developed a technique for drawing long, free-standing silica wires with diameters down to 50 nm that have a surface smoothness at the atomic level and a high uniformity of diameter. Light can be launched into these silica nanowires by optical evanescent coupling and the wires allow low-loss single-mode operation. They can be bent sharply, making it... Read more about Wrapping light around a hair: optics at the nanoscale
    Nonlinear optics at the nanoscale, at OSA Frontiers in Optics Meeting (Tucson, AZ), Wednesday, October 19, 2005:
    Silica nanowires allow the guiding and manipulation of light at the nanoscale. The linear optical properties of these wires can be easily modeled because they are a step-index, all-core cylindrical waveguides. The nonlinear optical properties wires open the door to novel applications in nanoscale photonics.
    Wrapping light around a hair, at Physics Colloquium, Northwestern University (Evanston, IL), Friday, November 18, 2005:
    Can light be guided by a fiber whose diameter is much smaller than the wavelength of the light? Can we mold the flow of light on the micrometer scale so it wraps, say, around a hair? Until recently the answer to these questions was ‘no’. We developed a technique for drawing long, free-standing silica wires with diameters down to 50 nm that have a surface smoothness at the atomic level and a high uniformity of diameter. Light can be launched into these silica nanowires by optical evanescent coupling and the wires allow low-loss single-mode operation. They can be bent sharply, making it... Read more about Wrapping light around a hair
    Supercontinuum in silica nanowires, at Photonics West 2006 (San Jose, CA), Thursday, January 26, 2006:
    Fibers are gaining widespread acceptance for generating ultra-broad spectra. The most common approach involves a photonic crystal fiber with carefully designed core size and dispersion characteristics. Although this system provides confinement of light to micrometer (and sometimes sub-micrometer) dimensions, this confinement is achieved at the expense of a complex core structure. An alternative to microstructured fibers is the use of silica fibers with sub-wavelength diameters whose waveguiding properties were initially demonstrated by our group. Silica nanowires are a model system because... Read more about Supercontinuum in silica nanowires

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