Presentations

    Stopping Time, at Special Lecture, University of Leuven (Leuven, Belgium), Thursday, October 1, 1992
    Stopping Time, at Special Lecture, Project SMART, University of New Hampshire (Durham, NH), Wednesday, July 6, 1994
    Stopping Time, at Sigma Xi Spring Banquet and Lecture, University of Massachusetts at Lowell (Lowell, MA), Thursday, May 4, 1995
    Stopping Time, at Special Lecture, University of Leuven (Leuven, Belgium), Thursday, October 1, 1992
    Stopping Time, at Special Lecture, Project SMART, University of New Hampshire (Durham, NH), Wednesday, July 6, 1994
    Stopping Time, at Sigma Xi Spring Banquet and Lecture, University of Massachusetts at Lowell (Lowell, MA), Thursday, May 4, 1995
    Stopping Time, at Professional Development Lecture at the Advanced Placement Reading, Trinity University (San Antonio, TX), Sunday, June 16, 1996
    Stopping Time, at William Mong Distinguished Lecture, The University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong, Hong Kong), Wednesday, November 5, 1997
    A portrait of Harvard, at Special Workshop on Teaching and Learning, The University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong, Hong Kong), Friday, February 27, 1998
    Why you can pass tests and still fail in the real world, at Innovations in the Classroom, Park Plaza Hotel (Boston, MA), Thursday, August 30, 2012
    Why is it that stellar students sometimes fail in the workplace and dropouts succeed? Assessment has been called the "hidden curriculum" as it drives students' study habits. In this talk I will argue that most, if not all, assessment is inauthentic -- focussing on skills that are not relevant in life.
    Less is More: Extreme Optics with Zero Refractive Index, at CityU OSA Chapter and Department of Physics and Materials Science Lecture, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong, China), Monday, March 27, 2017
    Nanotechnology has enabled the development of nanostructured composite materials (metamaterials) with exotic optical properties not found in nature. In the most extreme case, we can create materials which support light waves that propagate with infinite phase velocity, corresponding to a refractive index of zero. This zero index can only be achieved by simultaneously controlling the electric and magnetic resonances of the nanostructure. We present an in-plane metamaterial design consisting of silicon pillar arrays, embedded within a polymer matrix and sandwiched between gold layers. Using an... Read more about Less is More: Extreme Optics with Zero Refractive Index
    Assessment: The silent killer of learning, at Nanjing University of Science and Technology (Nanjing, China), Monday, June 5, 2017
    Why is it that stellar students sometimes fail in the workplace while dropouts succeed? One reason is that most, if not all, of our current assessment practices are inauthentic. Just as the lecture focuses on the delivery of information to students, so does assessment often focus on having students regurgitate that same information back to the instructor. Consequently, assessment fails to focus on the skills that are relevant in life in the 21st century. Assessment has been called the "hidden curriculum" as it is an important driver of students' study habits. Unless we rethink our approach to... Read more about Assessment: The silent killer of learning
    Less is More: Extreme Optics with Zero Refractive Index, at Nanjing University of Science and Technology (Nanjing, China), Monday, June 5, 2017
    Nanotechnology has enabled the development of nanostructured composite materials (metamaterials) with exotic optical properties not found in nature. In the most extreme case, we can create materials which support light waves that propagate with infinite phase velocity, corresponding to a refractive index of zero. This zero index can only be achieved by simultaneously controlling the electric and magnetic resonances of the nanostructure. We present an in-plane metamaterial design consisting of silicon pillar arrays, embedded within a polymer matrix and sandwiched between gold layers. Using an... Read more about Less is More: Extreme Optics with Zero Refractive Index
    Assessment: The silent killer of learning, at 2017 National STEM Cell Foundation Scholars Program, Western Kentucky University (Bowling Green, KY), Thursday, June 8, 2017
    Why is it that stellar students sometimes fail in the workplace while dropouts succeed? One reason is that most, if not all, of our current assessment practices are inauthentic. Just as the lecture focuses on the delivery of information to students, so does assessment often focus on having students regurgitate that same information back to the instructor. Consequently, assessment fails to focus on the skills that are relevant in life in the 21st century. Assessment has been called the "hidden curriculum" as it is an important driver of students' study habits. Unless we rethink our approach to... Read more about Assessment: The silent killer of learning
    Analyzing Educational Research using Vee Diagrams, at The College Student (Guest Lecturer), University of Texas at Austin (Austin, TX), Monday, January 30, 2012:
    In this lecture, we will discuss Vee Diagrams, a tool developed by Gowin in the 1970s to help biology students transfer knowledge from laboratory settings to larger contexts. Novak and Gowin (1984) descirbe the Vee as a heuristic to help students construct and make meaning of knowledge. I will introduce the key categories composing Vee Diagrams using examples from higher education practice. We will then collaboratively analyze a published educational research article using the Vee framework. After participating in this lecture, students will be able to use the Vee Diagram to analyze... Read more about Analyzing Educational Research using Vee Diagrams
    Anatomy of a College Readiness Assignment, at CRAFT Professional Development Institute, University of Texas at Austin (Austin,TX), Thursday, May 23, 2013:
    The College Readiness Assignment Field-Test (CRAFT) project is working to disseminate standalone lessons designed by expert educators to prepare students for college-level success. In this presentation will discuss the heart of the CRAFT project: college readiness assignments (CRAs). We will dissect CRAs and demonstrate how the various parts map to state standards.

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