Presentations

    Barriers to reform, at Physics Brown Bag Seminar, University of Colorado (Boulder, CO), Wednesday, April 21, 2004
    Talk of changing the way we educate students is nothing new. Maxwell wrote in his letters about students failing to learn. Socrates said we should teach by questioning, not telling. Yet, changing the way we teach seems to be more difficult than moving a mountain. One of the main reasons may be that we misinterpret the signals students send us.
    The scientific approach to teaching: research as a basis for course design, at ATLAS/GTP Roundtable Discussion, University of Colorado (Boulder, CO), Thursday, April 22, 2004
    Discussions of teaching -- even some publications -- abound with anecdotal evidence. Our intuition often supplants a systematic, scientific approach to finding out what works and what doesn't. Yet, research is increasingly demonstrating that our gut feelings about teaching are often wrong. In this talk I will discuss some research my group has done on gender issues in science courses and on the effectiveness of classroom demonstrations.
    What Campus Leadership Can Do to Improve Student Learning, at CERTI’s Leadership Luncheon Series Comments, University of Missouri-Rolla (Rolla, MO), Friday, October 22, 2004
    We are pleased to present Eric Mazur as our special guest speaker at CERTI’s Leadership Luncheon Series for October. We hope you can join your colleagues in this informative dialog as Eric expounds on the significance of leadership’s role in the learning process.
    Authentic Student Learning Evaluation Plans in Higher Education, at Seminario Internacional: Metodologías Activas y Evaluación de Aprendizaje, MECESUP (Santiago, Chile), Monday, July 18, 2011
    Open the doors to any classroom across the globe and you will observe an almost universal model for the evaluation of student learning. Instructors stand at the front of a lecture hall, teach content, students (at least we hope) attempt to learn that content, and then instructors evaluate that content learning through traditional assessments such as multiple-choice exams, quizzes, or research papers. Most of these conventional approaches to evaluation are one-dimensional and are not aligned with overarching learning goals that relate to competencies students actually need to progress... Read more about Authentic Student Learning Evaluation Plans in Higher Education
    Accelerating Academic Achievement at the University, at University of Texas at Austin (Austin, TX), Thursday, August 23, 2012:
    Improving student success is one of the most pressing issues in higher education across the world. Too often, despite succeeding in secondary classrooms, students enter college underprepared to engage in the rigors of undergraduate study, which results in a number of consequences for institutions. High dropout, failure, and withdrawal rates limit students’ abilities to take full advantage of their college experience and reach their highest potential. Failing to intervene has substantial cost implications for institutions, instructors, and societies within which an educated workforce is key... Read more about Accelerating Academic Achievement at the University
    Assessment: The silent killer of learning, at Stanford University (Palo Alto, CA), Friday, May 12, 2017:
    Why is it that stellar students sometimes fail in the workplace while dropouts succeed? One reason is that most, if not all, of our current assessment practices are inauthentic. Just as the lecture focuses on the delivery of information to students, so does assessment often focus on having students regurgitate that same information back to the instructor. Consequently, assessment fails to focus on the skills that are relevant in life in the 21st century. Assessment has been called the "hidden curriculum" as it is an important driver of students' study habits. Unless we rethink our approach to... Read more about Assessment: The silent killer of learning
    Blended Learning 101, at OnRamps Spring Professional Development Seminar, The University of Texas at Austin (Austin, TX), Monday, February 24, 2014:
    In this seminar, we will construct an understanding of what blended learning is and what it is not. Participants will generate their own definitions of blended learning and identify elements of their classroom teaching that qualify. We will also collaborate to determine why blended learning is important.
    Breakthroughs in nanophotonics, at Nanyang Technological University (Singapore), Wednesday, August 24, 2016:
    Nanotechnology has enabled the development of nanostructured composite materials (metamaterials) with exotic optical properties not found in nature. In the most extreme case, we can create materials which support light waves that propagate with infinite phase velocity, corresponding to a refractive index of zero. This zero index can only be achieved by simultaneously controlling the electric and magnetic resonances of the nanostructure. We present an in-plane metamaterial design consisting of silicon pillar arrays, embedded within a polymer matrix and sandwiched between gold layers. Using an... Read more about Breakthroughs in nanophotonics
    Flat space, deep learning, at BLC Webinar (Cambridge, MA), Friday, April 11, 2014:
    The teaching of physics to engineering students has remained stagnant for close to a century. In this novel team-based, project-based approach, we break the mold by giving students ownership of their learning. This new course has no standard lectures or exams, yet students’ conceptual gains are significantly greater than those obtained in traditional courses. The course blends six best practices to deliver a learning experience that helps students develop important skills, including communication, estimation, problem solving, and team skills, in addition to a solid conceptual understanding... Read more about Flat space, deep learning
    Flat space, deep learning, at University of Washington (Seattle, WA), Monday, May 12, 2014:
    The teaching of physics to engineering students has remained stagnant for close to a century. In this novel team-based, project-based approach, we break the mold by giving students ownership of their learning. This new course has no standard lectures or exams, yet students’ conceptual gains are significantly greater than those obtained in traditional courses. The course blends six best practices to deliver a learning experience that helps students develop important skills, including communication, estimation, problem solving, and team skills, in addition to a solid conceptual understanding... Read more about Flat space, deep learning
    Flat space, deep learning, at Penn State University (State College, PA), Friday, March 20, 2015:
    The teaching of physics to engineering students has remained stagnant for close to a century. In this novel team-based, project-based approach, we break the mold by giving students ownership of their learning. This new course has no standard lectures or exams, yet students’ conceptual gains are significantly greater than those obtained in traditional courses. The course blends six best practices to deliver a learning experience that helps students develop important skills, including communication, estimation, problem solving, and team skills, in addition to a solid conceptual understanding... Read more about Flat space, deep learning
    Flipped Classrooms 101, at Syracuse University (Syracuse, NY), Thursday, April 25, 2013:
    Instructors all over the globe are turning their students' worlds around by flipping their classrooms. In a flipped class, teachers move information coverage out of the lecture hall so that they can better leverage in-class time to address student difficulties and misconceptions. In this interactive session, Dr. Julie Schell will flip the workshop by providing brief introductory, pre-workshop activities to participants. She will use responses from these activities in the workshop and discuss the why, what, and how of flipped classrooms by confronting and resolving a series common myths about... Read more about Flipped Classrooms 101

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