Presentations

    Femtosecond laser doping of silicon, at Photonics West 2007 (San Jose, CA), Wednesday, January 24, 2007:
    Silicon is an abundant, stable, and efficient material for use in photovoltaic devices. However, it is costly to process, and is transparent at wavelengths longer than 1100nm, a spectral region containing 25% of solar energy. The limitations of silicon have spurred significant research into complex heterostructures that capture a greater fraction of sun’s energy. Engineering silicon to extend its effective spectral range, however, might offer a simpler way to increase the efficiency and decrease the cost of silicon-based photovoltaics. We report the creation of a thin, highly absorbing layer... Read more about Femtosecond laser doping of silicon
    Femtosecond laser doping of silicon for photovoltaic devices, at MIT Energy Conference, MIT (Boson, MA), Friday, April 11, 2008:
    Silicon is an abundant, stable, and efficient material for use in photovoltaic devices. However, it is costly to process, and is transparent at wavelengths longer than 1100nm, a spectral region containing 25% of solar energy. The limitations of silicon have spurred significant research into complex heterostructures that capture a greater fraction of sun’s energy. Engineering silicon to extend its effective spectral range, however, might offer a simpler way to increase the efficiency and decrease the cost of silicon-based photovoltaics. We report the creation of a thin, highly absorbing layer... Read more about Femtosecond laser doping of silicon for photovoltaic devices
    Extending silicon's reach: nonequlibrium doping using ultrafast lasers, at Physics Colloquium, University of Massachusetts, Lowell (Lowell, MA), Wednesday, October 22, 2008:
    Silicon is the world's widely used semiconductor. As the building block of a photovoltaic cell, silicon offers the best combination of stability, efficiency, and manufacturability. However, as an indirect absorber of light, thick layers of highly-pure, expensive material are required for efficient light absorption and charge collection. Furthermore, silicon does not absorb in the infrared, a spectral region that contains about a quarter of the sun's radiation. In this talk, I will discuss non-equilibrium laser-doping techniques we have been developing in the Mazur group that attempt to... Read more about Extending silicon's reach: nonequlibrium doping using ultrafast lasers
    Femtosecond laser doping of silicon beyond the equilibrium limit, at Photonics West 2009 (San Jose, CA), Tuesday, January 27, 2009:
    Shining intense, ultrashort laser pulses on the surface of a crystalline silicon wafer drastically changes the optical, material and electronic properties of the wafer. The resulting textured surface is highly absorbing and looks black to the eye. The properties of this 'black silicon' make it useful for a wide range of commercial devices. In particular, we have been able to fabricate highly-sensitive PIN photodetectors using this material. The sensitivity extends to wavelengths of 1600 nm making them particularly useful for applications in communications and remote sensing.
    Optical hyperdoping: Extending silicon's reach, at Jones Seminar, Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth University (Hanover, NH), Friday, February 13, 2009:
    Silicon is the world's most widely used semiconductor. As the building block of a photovoltaic cell, silicon offers a combination of stability, efficiency, and manufacturability currently unmatched by any other material. However, as an indirect absorber of light, thick layers of highly-pure, expensive material are required for efficient light absorption and charge collection. Furthermore, silicon does not absorb in the infrared, a spectral region that contains about a quarter of the sun's radiation. In this talk, I will discuss optical hyperdoping, a non-equilibrium laser-doping technique we... Read more about Optical hyperdoping: Extending silicon's reach
    Femtosecond laser doping of silicon: Electronic structure, at CLEO 2008 (San Jose, CA), Thursday, May 8, 2008:
    Shining intense, ultrashort laser pulses on the surface of a crystalline silicon wafer drastically changes the optical, material and electronic properties of the wafer. The resulting textured surface is highly absorbing and looks black to the eye. The properties of this 'black silicon' make it useful for a wide range of commercial devices. In particular, we have been able to fabricate highly-sensitive PIN photodetectors using this material. The sensitivity extends to wavelengths of 1600 nm making them particularly useful for applications in communications and remote sensing. We have performed... Read more about Femtosecond laser doping of silicon: Electronic structure