Presentations

    Academic Physicists' Introductory Teaching Improvement Efforts at Major Research Universities, at American Association of Physics Teachers Summer Meeting 2010 (Portland, OR, USA), Saturday, July 17, 2010
    There is no shortage of PER literature describing research-based, instructional strategies for improving teaching in introductory college physics courses. [1] It remains, however, that most physics faculty with visions of improved teaching based on such strategies must overcome significant barriers, including a reward system structured to direct faculty attention toward research and away from pedagogy. [2] Barriers to teaching improvement are compounded at major research universities (MRUs), where science faculty must balance extreme demands for research productivity with their teaching... Read more about Academic Physicists' Introductory Teaching Improvement Efforts at Major Research Universities
    Researching Implementation of Instructional Change in the Advanced Physics Laboratory, at American Association of Physics Teachers Summer Meeting 2010 (Portland, OR, USA), Saturday, July 17, 2010
    Abstract Body: Although physics education research on the implementation of instructional change in introductory physics laboratories is on the rise, dissemination of research on such change in advanced undergraduate laboratory courses is still lagging. This gap presents a problem for faculty seeking to improve students’ learning in advanced laboratories by using research-based pedagogies. In this study, we analyzed interview, observational, and course data to investigate four instructional changes implemented for the first time in an advanced physics laboratory course at one major research... Read more about Researching Implementation of Instructional Change in the Advanced Physics Laboratory
    Researching Student and Faculty College Readiness Views—A Holistic Approach, at National Association of Developmental Education (Orlando, FL), Thursday, February 23, 2012:
    This session shares current research on college readiness, with supporting quantitative data from a national assessment on first-year expectations (Cooperative Institutional Research Program (CIRP)) and qualitative data from a UT-Austin survey of faculty and student perceptions of college readiness. Data will be used to strengthen the argument for a broader definition of college readiness to include cognitive strategies beyond content knowledge. Presenters will share data that outline first-year student college expectations and attitudes of their level of college preparedness. This data shows... Read more about Researching Student and Faculty College Readiness Views—A Holistic Approach
    Using pedagogical innovation to improve student success in first-year courses, at 2013 International HETL Conference, University of Central Florida (Orlando, FL, USA), Monday, January 14, 2013:
    Student retention is a higher education problem that penetrates diverse contexts, including institutional types, subject matter, and geographic region. Theories have historically linked increased retention rates to concepts such as campus involvement and institutional engagement (Tinto, 1993). Most higher education retention interventions thus focus on keeping students who are already at university, enrolled. Attrition is at its highest at the end of the first year of study (Tinto, 1993). One reason students drop out at this stage is because they are struggling academically in large,... Read more about Using pedagogical innovation to improve student success in first-year courses
    Peer Instruction Network, at Physics Education Research Mini Conference, Harvard University (Cambridge, MA), Friday, November 16, 2012:
    Teaching within an academic research career is often cast as a private enterprise, representing a silo among professors’ more communal work within research groups and service activities. Just like new frontiers in science research, innovation in science education rarely happens in isolation, more often it occurs through joint ventures. In this presentation, we introduce Peer Instruction Network, a new social network developed at Harvard University to connect educators worldwide in their efforts to shape the terrains of how and what people learn in the 21st century. The presentation will... Read more about Peer Instruction Network
    Flipping Your Classroom With Peer Instruction: How To Turn Your Students' Worlds Right Side Up, at FlipCon13 (Stillwater, MN), Tuesday, June 18, 2013:
    Instructors all over the globe are turning their students' worlds right side up by flipping their classrooms. In a flipped class, teachers typically move information coverage out of formal class meetings so that they can better leverage in-class time to address student difficulties or misconceptions. Flipped learning is much more than watching videos and doing homework in class. In this session, Dr. Julie Schell will introduce one research-based flipped method called Peer Instruction. A primary goal of Peer Instruction is to radically transform students’ in-class experiences. Originally... Read more about Flipping Your Classroom With Peer Instruction: How To Turn Your Students' Worlds Right Side Up
    Science pedagogy - no longer a private frontier, at Frontiers in Science Teaching, Aarhus University (Aarhus, Denmark), Monday, June 18, 2012:
    Teaching within an academic research career is often cast as a private enterprise, representing a silo among professors’ more communal work within research groups and service activities. Just like new frontiers in science research, innovation in science education often involves joint ventures. In this presentation, we introduce for the first time Peer Instruction Network, a new social network developed at Harvard University to connect educators worldwide in their efforts to shape the terrains of how and what people learn in the 21st century. The presentation will include a live... Read more about Science pedagogy - no longer a private frontier
    Turn to your neighbor, at Turning Technology User Conference: Aarhus, Denmark, Aarhus University (Aarhus, Denmark), Tuesday, June 19, 2012:
    Peer Instruction (PI) is a teaching method that leverages the power of cutting-edge learning technologies, such as clickers, to transform learning. The centerpiece of Peer Instruction is the ConcepTest, a short interactive question that helps uncover student misconceptions. “Turn to your neighbor” is the classic catch-phrase of PI methodology, whereby teachers encourage students to think about a question, vote on their answer, and then turn to their neighbor to engage, rather than sitting passively in a lecture. In this presentation, we examine two big, open questions frequently posed by... Read more about Turn to your neighbor