Presentations

    The scientific approach to teaching: research as a basis for course design, at ATLAS/GTP Roundtable Discussion, University of Colorado (Boulder, CO), Thursday, April 22, 2004
    Discussions of teaching -- even some publications -- abound with anecdotal evidence. Our intuition often supplants a systematic, scientific approach to finding out what works and what doesn't. Yet, research is increasingly demonstrating that our gut feelings about teaching are often wrong. In this talk I will discuss some research my group has done on gender issues in science courses and on the effectiveness of classroom demonstrations.
    Visualizations and visual illusions: how the mind tricks us, at University of Colorado (Boulder, CO), Friday, April 23, 2004:
    Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning.
    Visualizations and visual illusions: how the mind tricks us, at Collaborative for Excellence in Teacher Preparation Conference, Clarion University (Clarion, PA), Wednesday, August 18, 2004:
    Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning.
    Visualizations and visual illusions: how the mind tricks us, at 2004 National Assembly of PKAL's Faculty for the 21st Century (Dallas, TX), Friday, October 15, 2004:
    Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning.
    What Campus Leadership Can Do to Improve Student Learning, at CERTI’s Leadership Luncheon Series Comments, University of Missouri-Rolla (Rolla, MO), Friday, October 22, 2004
    We are pleased to present Eric Mazur as our special guest speaker at CERTI’s Leadership Luncheon Series for October. We hope you can join your colleagues in this informative dialog as Eric expounds on the significance of leadership’s role in the learning process.
    Visualizations and visual illusions: how the mind tricks us, at OSA Optics in the South East Conference, University of North Carolina Charlotte (Charlotte, NC), Thursday, November 4, 2004:
    Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning.
    Visualizations and visual illusions: how the mind tricks us, at Lowell Regional Physics Alliance Meeting, University of Massachusetts Lowell (Lowell, MA), Thursday, November 18, 2004:
    Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning.
    Visualizations and visual illusions: how the mind tricks us, at Center for Astrophysics Lecture, Harvard University (Cambridge, MA), Tuesday, January 11, 2005:
    Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning.
    How the mind tricks us: visualizations and visual illlusions, at SPS/GPA Physics Banquet, University of Massachusetts Lowell (Lowell, MA), Tuesday, May 3, 2005:
    Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning.
    Visual learning: how much do we learn from what we see?, at AAPT Summer Meeting (Salt Lake City, UT), Wednesday, August 10, 2005:
    Classroom demonstrations and textbook illustrations are often considered to be key tools in improving student understanding of physical concepts. Vizualization alone, however, does not necessarily improve student understanding and can even create additional misconceptions. Active engagement of the students is essential to avoid the creation of a “wrong picture”.
    Visualizations and visual illusions: how the mind tricks us, at 2006 Cottrell Scholars Meeting (Tucson, AZ), Friday, July 7, 2006:
    Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning.
    The scientific approach to teaching: Research as a basis for course design, at 2006 Cottrell Scholars Meeting (Tucson, AZ), Saturday, July 8, 2006:
    Discussions of teaching -- even some publications -- abound with anecdotal evidence. Our intuition often supplants a systematic, scientific approach to finding out what works and what doesn't work. Yet, research is increasingly demonstrating that our gut feelings about teaching are often wrong. In this talk I will discuss some research my group has done on gender issues in science courses and on the effectiveness of classroom demonstrations.
    Can Students Evaluate Their Own Understanding?, at AAPT Summer Meeting (Syracuse, NY), Tuesday, July 25, 2006:
    Can students assess their own understanding in introductory physics? How does their assessment change during the learning process? Instructors often gauge how well students are assimilating the material based on the number of questions or confused looks they receive during their interactions with students. However, it is unclear how well students are able to recognize their own understanding (or lack thereof). In this talk, we present preliminary results from our study of the relationship between students' perceived understanding and their actual understanding of introductory physics concepts... Read more about Can Students Evaluate Their Own Understanding?
    How the mind tricks us: visualizations and visual illusions, at SLAC Colloquium, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (Menlo Park, CA), Monday, October 9, 2006:
    Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning.
    How the mind tricks us: visualizations and visual illusions, at International Conference on Technology in Collegiate Mathematics, Westin Copley Plaza (Boston, MA), Friday, February 16, 2007:
    Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning
    How the mind tricks us: visualizations and visual illusions, at Course on Frontier Developments in Optics and Spectroscopy, Centro Ettore Majorana (Erice, Italy), Monday, June 25, 2007:
    Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning
    How the mind tricks us: visualizations and visual illusions, at Phi Beta Kappa Lecture, Morehouse College (Atlanta, GA), Wednesday, September 26, 2007:
    Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning
    How the mind tricks us: visualizations and visual illusions, at Physics Colloquium, Amherst College (Amherst, MA), Thursday, October 4, 2007:
    Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning
    Assessing science teaching: are we teaching the right thing?, at Teaching & Learning Lunch, Amherst College (Amherst, MA), Friday, October 5, 2007:
    Discussions of teaching -- even some publications -- abound with anecdotal evidence. Our intuition often supplants a systematic, scientific approach to finding out what works and what doesn't work. Yet, research is increasingly demonstrating that our gut feelings about teaching are often wrong. In this talk I will discuss some research my group has done on gender issues in science courses and on the effectiveness of classroom demonstrations.

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