Presentations

    How the mind tricks us: visualizations and visual illusions, at the Centre for the Study of Learning and Performance and the Centre for Teaching and Learning Services, Concordia University (Montreal, Canada), Thursday, January 17, 2008:
    Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning
    How the mind tricks us: visualizations and visual illusions, at Phi Beta Kappa Lecture, University of Delaware (Newark, DE), Monday, March 10, 2008:
    Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning.
    How the mind tricks us: visualizations and visual illusions, at Phi Beta Kappa Lecture Visiting Scholar Lecture, University of Mary Washington (Fredericksburg, VA), Wednesday, March 12, 2008:
    Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning
    How the mind tricks us: visualizations and visual illusions, at Phi Beta Kappa Public Lecture, University of Tennessee (Knoxville, TN), Thursday, April 3, 2008:
    Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning
    How the mind tricks us: visualizations and visual illusions, at Phi Beta Kappa Lecture, Pomona College (Claremont, CA), Monday, April 14, 2008:
    Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning
    The scientific approach to teaching: Research as a basis for course design, at Teaching and Learning Committee Lunch Talk, Pomona College (Claremont, CA), Monday, April 14, 2008:
    Discussions of teaching -- even some publications -- abound with anecdotal evidence. Our intuition often supplants a systematic, scientific approach to finding out what works and what doesn't work. Yet, research is increasingly demonstrating that our gut feelings about teaching are often wrong. In this talk I will discuss some research my group has done on gender issues in science courses and on the effectiveness of classroom demonstrations.
    How the mind tricks us: visualizations and visual illusions, at Phi Beta Kappa Public Lecture, Yale University (New Haven, CT), Wednesday, April 23, 2008:
    Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning
    The make-believe world of real-world physics, at AAPT 2008 Summer Meeting (Millikan Award lecture), University of Alberta (Edmonton, AB, Canada), Tuesday, July 22, 2008:
    That physics describes the real world is a given for physicists. In spite of tireless efforts by instructors to connect physics to the real world, students walk away from physics courses believing physicists live in a world of their own. Are students clueless about the real world? Or are we perhaps deluding ourselves and misleading our students about the real world?
    The scientific approach to teaching: Research as a basis for course design, at Physics Colloquium, University of Iowa (Iowa City, IA), Monday, September 8, 2008:
    Discussions of teaching -- even some publications -- abound with anecdotal evidence. Our intuition often supplants a systematic, scientific approach to finding out what works and what doesn't work. Yet, research is increasingly demonstrating that our gut feelings about teaching are often wrong. In this talk I will discuss some research my group has done on gender issues in science courses and on the effectiveness of classroom demonstrations.
    How the mind tricks us: visualizations and visual illusions, at Public Lecture, University of Iowa (Iowa City, IA), Tuesday, September 9, 2008:
    Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning
    The make-believe world of real-world physics, at Teaching and Learning Center Public Lecture, Stanford University (Palo Alto, CA), Thursday, October 30, 2008:
    That physics describes the real world is a given for physicists. In spite of tireless efforts by instructors to connect physics to the real world, students walk away from physics courses believing physicists live in a world of their own. Are students clueless about the real world? Or are we perhaps deluding ourselves and misleading our students about the real world?
    The scientific approach to teaching: Research as a basis for course design, at Seminario Internacional sobre la Enseñanza y Aprendizaje Efectivo, Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez (Santiago, Chile), Monday, January 19, 2009:
    Discussions of teaching -- even some publications -- abound with anecdotal evidence. Our intuition often supplants a systematic, scientific approach to finding out what works and what doesn't work. Yet, research is increasingly demonstrating that our gut feelings about teaching are often wrong. In this talk I will discuss some research my group has done on gender issues in science courses and on the effectiveness of classroom demonstrations.
    How the mind tricks us: visualizations and visual illusions, at Seminario Internacional sobre la Enseñanza y Aprendizaje Efectivo, Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez (Santiago, Chile), Tuesday, January 20, 2009:
    Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning
    How the mind tricks us: visualizations and visual illusions, at Public Lecture, Questacon (Canberra, Australia), Thursday, March 26, 2009:
    Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning
    The scientific approach to teaching: Research as a basis for course design, at Workshop on Interactive Learning in Undergraduate Physics, The Australian National University (Canberra, Australia), Friday, March 27, 2009:
    Discussions of teaching -- even some publications -- abound with anecdotal evidence. Our intuition often supplants a systematic, scientific approach to finding out what works and what doesn't work. Yet, research is increasingly demonstrating that our gut feelings about teaching are often wrong. In this talk I will discuss some research my group has done on gender issues in science courses and on the effectiveness of classroom demonstrations.
    The scientific approach to teaching: Research as a basis for course design, at 1st Joint Nordic Physical Society Meeting: Education Societies Premeeting, Technical University of Denmark (Copenhagen, Denmark), Tuesday, June 16, 2009:
    Discussions of teaching -- even some publications -- abound with anecdotal evidence. Our intuition often supplants a systematic, scientific approach to finding out what works and what doesn't work. Yet, research is increasingly demonstrating that our gut feelings about teaching are often wrong. In this talk I will discuss some research my group has done on gender issues in science courses and on the effectiveness of classroom demonstrations.
    The make-believe world of real-world physics, at NATO Advanced Study Institute on Biophotonics: Spectroscopy, imaging, sensing, and manipulation, Centro Ettore Majorana (Erice, Sicily), Friday, July 10, 2009:
    That physics describes the real world is a given for physicists. In spite of tireless efforts by instructors to connect physics to the real world, students walk away from physics courses believing physicists live in a world of their own. Are students clueless about the real world? Or are we perhaps deluding ourselves and misleading our students about the real world?
    The make-believe world of real-world physics, at Physics Colloquium, Brandeis University (Waltham, MA), Tuesday, September 8, 2009:
    That physics describes the real world is a given for physicists. In spite of tireless efforts by instructors to connect physics to the real world, students walk away from physics courses believing physicists live in a world of their own. Are students clueless about the real world? Or are we perhaps deluding ourselves and misleading our students about the real world?
    The scientific approach to teaching: Research as a basis for course design, at Nuevas Tendencias en la Enseñanza de la Física, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla (Puebla, Mexico), Saturday, September 19, 2009:
    Discussions of teaching -- even some publications -- abound with anecdotal evidence. Our intuition often supplants a systematic, scientific approach to finding out what works and what doesn't work. Yet, research is increasingly demonstrating that our gut feelings about teaching are often wrong. In this talk I will discuss some research my group has done on gender issues in science courses and on the effectiveness of classroom demonstrations.
    The make-believe world of real-world physics, at Public Lecture, Temple University (Philadelphia, PA), Monday, September 21, 2009:
    That physics describes the real world is a given for physicists. In spite of tireless efforts by instructors to connect physics to the real world, students walk away from physics courses believing physicists live in a world of their own. Are students clueless about the real world? Or are we perhaps deluding ourselves and misleading our students about the real world?

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