Presentations

    Towards increased efficiency in solar energy harvesting via intermediate states, at Gordon Research Conference on Defects in Semiconductors, University of New England (Biddeford, ME), Monday, August 13, 2012:
    Shining intense, ultrashort laser pulses on the surface of a crystalline silicon wafer drastically changes the optical, material and electronic properties of the wafer. The process has two effects: it structures the surface and incorporate dopants into the sample to a concentration highly exceeding the equilibrium solubility limit. This femtosecond laser "hyperdoping technique" enables the fabrication of defect- and bandgap engineered semiconductors, and laser texturing further enhances the optical density through excellent light trapping. Hyperdoped silicon opens the door for novel... Read more about Towards increased efficiency in solar energy harvesting via intermediate states
    Towards increased efficiency in solar energy harvesting via intermediate states, at SPIE Laser Material Processing for Solar Energy Devices II (San Diego, CA), Wednesday, August 28, 2013:
    Shining intense, ultrashort laser pulses on the surface of a crystalline silicon wafer drastically changes the optical, material and electronic properties of the wafer. The process has two effects: it structures the surface and incorporate dopants into the sample to a concentration highly exceeding the equilibrium solubility limit. This femtosecond laser "hyperdoping technique" enables the fabrication of defect- and bandgap engineered semiconductors, and laser texturing further enhances the optical density through excellent light trapping. Hyperdoped silicon opens the door for novel... Read more about Towards increased efficiency in solar energy harvesting via intermediate states
    Towards increased efficiency in solar energy harvesting via intermediate states, at SPIE Laser Material Processing for Solar Energy Devices II (San Diego, CA), Wednesday, August 28, 2013:
    Shining intense, ultrashort laser pulses on the surface of a crystalline silicon wafer drastically changes the optical, material and electronic properties of the wafer. The process has two effects: it structures the surface and incorporate dopants into the sample to a concentration highly exceeding the equilibrium solubility limit. This femtosecond laser "hyperdoping technique" enables the fabrication of defect- and bandgap engineered semiconductors, and laser texturing further enhances the optical density through excellent light trapping. Hyperdoped silicon opens the door for novel... Read more about Towards increased efficiency in solar energy harvesting via intermediate states
    Laser-processing of semiconductors for solar energy harvesting applications, at Laser World of Photonics conference (Mumbai, India), Tuesday, November 12, 2013:
    Shining intense, ultrashort laser pulses on the surface of a crystalline silicon wafer drastically changes the optical, material and electronic properties of the wafer. The process has two effects: it structures the surface and incorporate dopants into the sample to a concentration highly exceeding the equilibrium solubility limit. This femtosecond laser "hyperdoping technique" enables the fabrication of defect- and bandgap engineered semiconductors, and laser texturing further enhances the optical density through excellent light trapping. Hyperdoped silicon opens the door for novel... Read more about Laser-processing of semiconductors for solar energy harvesting applications
    Nonequilibrium materials: using ultrafast laser pulses to change band structures, at SPIE Conference on Ultrafast Bandgap Photonics (Baltimore, MD), Sunday, April 17, 2016:
    Soon after it was discovered that intense laser pulses of nanosecond duration from a ruby laser could anneal the lattice of silicon, it was established that this so-called pulsed laser annealing is a thermal process. The past two decades have show that ultrashort laser pulses in the femtosecond regime can induce athermal, nonequilibrium processes that lead to either transient phase changes in semiconductors through ultrafast ionization or permanent phase changes through nonequilibrium doping. In this talk we will review work in both of these regimes and show how ultrafast lasers can be used... Read more about Nonequilibrium materials: using ultrafast laser pulses to change band structures
    Laser doping and texturing of silicon for advanced optoelectronic devices, at Frontiers in Optics (FiO)/Laser Science (LS) Conference (Rochester, NY), Monday, October 17, 2016:
    Irradiating a semiconductor sample with intense laser pulses in the presence of dopants drastically changes the optical, material, and electronic properties of the sample. The resulting material has applications for photodetectors and, potentially, intermediate-band solar cells.

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