Presentations

    The scientific approach to teaching: Research as a basis for course design, at ICPE2009 (Bangkok, Thailand), Monday, October 19, 2009:
    Discussions of teaching -- even some publications -- abound with anecdotal evidence. Our intuition often supplants a systematic, scientific approach to finding out what works and what doesn't work. Yet, research is increasingly demonstrating that our gut feelings about teaching are often wrong. In this talk I will discuss some research my group has done on gender issues in science courses and on the effectiveness of classroom demonstrations.
    Venturing toward better teaching: Professors' knowledge base for pedagogical improvement in introductory STEM classrooms at major research universities., at The Association for The Study of Higher Education Annual Meeting (Vancouver, BC, Canada), Thursday, November 5, 2009
    Educational reformers often portray the majority of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) professors at American research universities as subject-matter experts but pedagogical novices (Baldwin, 2009; Boyer, 1998; Coopala, 2009; Handeslman et al., 2006; Wieman, 2006). Images of STEM professors as lacking knowledge about best teaching practices are especially prevalent in discussions about academic researchers: A wide array of constituents, from students and journalists to scholars of teaching and learning, have long proffered views of academic researchers as so heavily... Read more about Venturing toward better teaching: Professors' knowledge base for pedagogical improvement in introductory STEM classrooms at major research universities.
    How the mind tricks us: visualizations and visual illusions, at Jefferson Lab Science Series, Jefferson Laboratory (Newport News, VA), Wednesday, December 9, 2009:
    Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning
    The scientific approach to teaching: Research as a basis for course design, at University of Melbourne (Melbourne, Australia), Monday, January 18, 2010:
    Discussions of teaching -- even some publications -- abound with anecdotal evidence. Our intuition often supplants a systematic, scientific approach to finding out what works and what doesn't work. Yet, research is increasingly demonstrating that our gut feelings about teaching are often wrong. In this talk I will discuss some research my group has done on gender issues in science courses and on the effectiveness of classroom demonstrations.
    The scientific approach to teaching: Research as a basis for course design, at University of Adelaide (Adelaide, Australia), Wednesday, January 20, 2010:
    Discussions of teaching -- even some publications -- abound with anecdotal evidence. Our intuition often supplants a systematic, scientific approach to finding out what works and what doesn't work. Yet, research is increasingly demonstrating that our gut feelings about teaching are often wrong. In this talk I will discuss some research my group has done on gender issues in science courses and on the effectiveness of classroom demonstrations.
    The scientific approach to teaching: Research as a basis for course design, at 2nd Annual DTI Spring Conference, Community College of Denver (Denver, CO), Friday, April 2, 2010:
    Discussions of teaching -- even some publications -- abound with anecdotal evidence. Our intuition often supplants a systematic, scientific approach to finding out what works and what doesn't work. Yet, research is increasingly demonstrating that our gut feelings about teaching are often wrong. In this talk I will discuss some research my group has done on gender issues in science courses and on the effectiveness of classroom demonstrations.
    The make-believe world of real-world physics, at Spring 2010 Meeting of the Chicago Section of the American Association of Physics Teachers, Chicago State University (Chicago, IL), Saturday, April 24, 2010:
    That physics describes the real world is a given for physicists. In spite of tireless efforts by instructors to connect physics to the real world, students walk away from physics courses believing physicists live in a world of their own. Are students clueless about the real world? Or are we perhaps deluding ourselves and misleading our students about the real world?
    The make-believe world of real-world physics, at Public Lecture, University of Iowa (Iowa City, IA), Thursday, April 29, 2010:
    That physics describes the real world is a given for physicists. In spite of tireless efforts by instructors to connect physics to the real world, students walk away from physics courses believing physicists live in a world of their own. Are students clueless about the real world? Or are we perhaps deluding ourselves and misleading our students about the real world?
    Research as a basis for course design, at Faculty Development Workshop, University of Iowa (Iowa City, IA), Friday, April 30, 2010:
    Discussions of teaching -- even some publications -- abound with anecdotal evidence. Our intuition often supplants a systematic, scientific approach to finding out what works and what doesn't work. Yet, research is increasingly demonstrating that our gut feelings about teaching are often wrong. In this talk I will discuss some research my group has done on gender issues in science courses and on the effectiveness of classroom demonstrations.
    Academic Researchers' Joint Ventures toward Undergraduate STEM Teaching Improvement at Major Research Universities, at American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting - Poster Session (Denver, Colorado), Sunday, May 2, 2010:
    Based on a qualitative study of 20 research-active science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) professors’ teaching improvement efforts, this paper suggests that some academic researchers engage in highly-intensive, joint ventures to enhance their introductory pedagogy at major research universities. The study casts professors’ participation in such communal teaching activities as voluntary and as enacted despite problematic career structures that promote collaboration in research, not in teaching. Based on interviews, observations and documentary analysis, the study posits that... Read more about Academic Researchers' Joint Ventures toward Undergraduate STEM Teaching Improvement at Major Research Universities
    Academic Physicists' Introductory Teaching Improvement Efforts at Major Research Universities, at American Association of Physics Teachers Summer Meeting 2010 (Portland, OR, USA), Saturday, July 17, 2010
    There is no shortage of PER literature describing research-based, instructional strategies for improving teaching in introductory college physics courses. [1] It remains, however, that most physics faculty with visions of improved teaching based on such strategies must overcome significant barriers, including a reward system structured to direct faculty attention toward research and away from pedagogy. [2] Barriers to teaching improvement are compounded at major research universities (MRUs), where science faculty must balance extreme demands for research productivity with their teaching... Read more about Academic Physicists' Introductory Teaching Improvement Efforts at Major Research Universities
    Researching Implementation of Instructional Change in the Advanced Physics Laboratory, at American Association of Physics Teachers Summer Meeting 2010 (Portland, OR, USA), Saturday, July 17, 2010
    Abstract Body: Although physics education research on the implementation of instructional change in introductory physics laboratories is on the rise, dissemination of research on such change in advanced undergraduate laboratory courses is still lagging. This gap presents a problem for faculty seeking to improve students’ learning in advanced laboratories by using research-based pedagogies. In this study, we analyzed interview, observational, and course data to investigate four instructional changes implemented for the first time in an advanced physics laboratory course at one major research... Read more about Researching Implementation of Instructional Change in the Advanced Physics Laboratory
    Assessing and Enhancing Student Learning in the Advanced Physics Lab, at AAPT Summer Meeting, 2010 (Portland, Oregon), Monday, July 19, 2010
    Efforts to reform instructional physics labs--by defining measurable goals and improving student learning--have led to several innovations (i.e. rubrics for enhanced formative assessment) at the introductory level. However, researchers have yet to explore similar innovations in advanced laboratory courses. In an effort to fill this void, we investigated the observable aspects of student learning, culled from submitted written work and discussions between students and faculty, in light of specific changes to the advanced lab course (clear statement of learning goals, better-defined activities... Read more about Assessing and Enhancing Student Learning in the Advanced Physics Lab
    Investigación como base para el diseño de cursos, at Universidad de Costa Rica (San Jose, Costa Rica), Thursday, August 5, 2010:
    Discussions of teaching -- even some publications -- abound with anecdotal evidence. Our intuition often supplants a systematic, scientific approach to finding out what works and what doesn't work. Yet, research is increasingly demonstrating that our gut feelings about teaching are often wrong. In this talk I will discuss some research my group has done on gender issues in science courses and on the effectiveness of classroom demonstrations.
    The make-believe world of real-world physics, at Universidad de Costa Rica (San Jose, Costa Rica), Friday, August 6, 2010:
    That physics describes the real world is a given for physicists. In spite of tireless efforts by instructors to connect physics to the real world, students walk away from physics courses believing physicists live in a world of their own. Are students clueless about the real world? Or are we perhaps deluding ourselves and misleading our students about the real world?
    Why teaching problem solving is a problem, at 2010 Science and Technology in Society Forum (Kyoto, Japan), Sunday, October 3, 2010:
    Of all the skills that are important in life in general and science, math and engineering education I n particular, the one that is most generally considered to be the most important one is problem solving. But what is problem solving? Problem solving is the process of moving toward a goal when the path to that goal is uncertain. The traditional approach to education largely fails to teach real problem solving. What can we do to address this problem?
    The make-believe world of real-world physics, at University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), Thursday, October 14, 2010:
    That physics describes the real world is a given for physicists. In spite of tireless efforts by instructors to connect physics to the real world, students walk away from physics courses believing physicists live in a world of their own. Are students clueless about the real world? Or are we perhaps deluding ourselves and misleading our students about the real world?
    The scientific approach to teaching: Research as a basis for course design, at Univeristy of Alaska Fairbanks (Fairbanks, AK), Thursday, October 28, 2010:
    Discussions of teaching -- even some publications -- abound with anecdotal evidence. Our intuition often supplants a systematic, scientific approach to finding out what works and what doesn't work. Yet, research is increasingly demonstrating that our gut feelings about teaching are often wrong. In this talk I will discuss some research my group has done on gender issues in science courses and on the effectiveness of classroom demonstrations.

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