Presentations

    How the mind tricks us: visualizations and visual illusions, at University of Alaska Fairbanks (Fairbanks, AK), Friday, October 29, 2010:
    Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information � in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning
    Crafting learning goals using Backward Design: A hands-on workshop, at Center for Teaching and Learning, University of Texas, Austin (Austin, Texas, USA), Wednesday, November 17, 2010
    In this workshop we will go through the process of developing effective learning goals using the non-conventional approach of Backward Design (Wiggins and McTighe). After taking this workshop, new or experienced instructors and instructional developers will be able to identify best practices for preparing effective learning goals and revise a set of more traditional learning goals based on those best practices.
    An Evaluation of Effectiveness of Short Physics Workshops for In-service Teachers, at American Association of Physics Teachers Winter Meeting 2011 (Jacksonville, FL), Monday, January 10, 2011
    There is compelling evidence that Peer Instruction improves students’ ability to complete both conceptual and traditional computational physics problems. We used Peer Instruction during a four-week long (120 hours) retraining course for in-service teachers of grades 7-12 in Korea. The goal of this study is to investigate if Peer Instruction can be used to improve the participating teachers’ conceptual understanding of introductory physics concepts. To this end we pre- and post-tested the teachers using the Force Concept Inventory and The Conceptual Survey of Electricity and Magnetism.... Read more about An Evaluation of Effectiveness of Short Physics Workshops for In-service Teachers
    The scientific approach to teaching: Research as a basis for course design, at Tufts STEM Education Lecture Series, Tufts University (Medford, MA), Monday, March 7, 2011:
    Discussions of teaching -- even some publications -- abound with anecdotal evidence. Our intuition often supplants a systematic, scientific approach to finding out what works and what doesn't work. Yet, research is increasingly demonstrating that our gut feelings about teaching are often wrong. In this talk I will discuss some research my group has done on gender issues in science courses and on the effectiveness of classroom demonstrations.
    The scientific approach to teaching: Research as a basis for course design, at Special campus-wide event, University of Missouri St. Louis (St. Louis, MO), Wednesday, March 9, 2011:
    Discussions of teaching -- even some publications -- abound with anecdotal evidence. Our intuition often supplants a systematic, scientific approach to finding out what works and what doesn't work. Yet, research is increasingly demonstrating that our gut feelings about teaching are often wrong. In this talk I will discuss some research my group has done on gender issues in science courses and on the effectiveness of classroom demonstrations.
    The scientific approach to teaching: Research as a basis for course design, at 3rd Annual Conference of Educational Research Center (Brummana, Lebanon), Sunday, March 27, 2011:
    Discussions of teaching -- even some publications -- abound with anecdotal evidence. Our intuition often supplants a systematic, scientific approach to finding out what works and what doesn't work. Yet, research is increasingly demonstrating that our gut feelings about teaching are often wrong. In this talk I will discuss some research my group has done on gender issues in science courses and on the effectiveness of classroom demonstrations.
    The make-believe world of real-world physics, at Spring 2011 Joint Meeting of the New England Sections of the American Physical Society & American Association of Physics Teachers, UMass Lowell (Lowell, MA), Friday, April 8, 2011:
    That physics describes the real world is a given for physicists. In spite of tireless efforts by instructors to connect physics to the real world, students walk away from physics courses believing physicists live in a world of their own. Are students clueless about the real world? Or are we perhaps deluding ourselves and misleading our students about the real world?
    The scientific approach to teaching: Research as a basis for course design, at Harvard Medical Education Grand Rounds, Harvard Medical School (Boston, MA), Friday, April 8, 2011:
    Discussions of teaching -- even some publications -- abound with anecdotal evidence. Our intuition often supplants a systematic, scientific approach to finding out what works and what doesn't work. Yet, research is increasingly demonstrating that our gut feelings about teaching are often wrong. In this talk I will discuss some research my group has done on gender issues in science courses and on the effectiveness of classroom demonstrations.
    The scientific approach to teaching: Research as a basis for course design, at Universidad del Norte (Barranquilla, Colombia), Friday, June 10, 2011:
    Discussions of teaching -- even some publications -- abound with anecdotal evidence. Our intuition often supplants a systematic, scientific approach to finding out what works and what doesn't work. Yet, research is increasingly demonstrating that our gut feelings about teaching are often wrong. In this talk I will discuss some research my group has done on gender issues in science courses and on the effectiveness of classroom demonstrations.
    Using goal-based instructional design to frame innovative learning experiences, at Renovacion Pedagogica 2011, Universidad Del Norte (Barranquilla, Colombia), Friday, June 10, 2011:
    Instructors are at their core, learning designers. Most begin drawing their plans for student learning using a traditional approach, considering: Which text book and readings should I use? Which topics should I cover? How should I test my students’ knowledge? Advances in learning science suggest turning this traditional approach to course planning upside down and design student learning experiences by first asking a set of different questions: What exactly do I want my students to be able to do after they take this course? What are the learning goals I have for... Read more about Using goal-based instructional design to frame innovative learning experiences
    Authentic Student Learning Evaluation Plans in Higher Education, at Renovacion Pedagogica 2011, Universidad Del Norte (Barranquilla, Colombia), Friday, June 10, 2011:
    Open the doors to any classroom across the globe and you will observe an almost universal model for the evaluation of student learning. Instructors stand at the front of a lecture hall, teach content, students (at least we hope) attempt to learn that content, and then instructors evaluate that content learning through traditional assessments such as multiple-choice exams, quizzes, or research papers. Most of these conventional approaches to evaluation are one-dimensional and are not aligned with overarching learning goals that relate to competencies students actually need to progress... Read more about Authentic Student Learning Evaluation Plans in Higher Education
    The Syllabus: A Blueprint for Innovative Learning Experiences in Colombian Higher Education, at Renovacion Pedagogica 2011, Universidad Del Norte (Barranquilla, Colombia), Friday, June 10, 2011:
    The syllabus is the blueprint for learning in higher education; it narrates the story of the larger learning experiences instructors and students should expect to encounter as they navigate the terrains of a course. It also represents the "logic" or "theory" of a course: If instructors and students use the syllabus as a guide, engage seriously in the content and activities laid out, then learning experiences should occur. Innovative syllabi bring together and make clear instructors' expectations for student learning (Learning Goals), the evidence and... Read more about The Syllabus: A Blueprint for Innovative Learning Experiences in Colombian Higher Education
    Authentic Student Learning Evaluation Plans in Higher Education, at Seminario Internacional: Metodologías Activas y Evaluación de Aprendizaje, MECESUP (Santiago, Chile), Monday, July 18, 2011
    Open the doors to any classroom across the globe and you will observe an almost universal model for the evaluation of student learning. Instructors stand at the front of a lecture hall, teach content, students (at least we hope) attempt to learn that content, and then instructors evaluate that content learning through traditional assessments such as multiple-choice exams, quizzes, or research papers. Most of these conventional approaches to evaluation are one-dimensional and are not aligned with overarching learning goals that relate to competencies students actually need to progress... Read more about Authentic Student Learning Evaluation Plans in Higher Education
    Pedagogía scientífica, at Seminario Internacional: Metodologías Activas y Evaluación de Aprendizaje (Santiago, Chile), Wednesday, July 20, 2011:
    Discussions of teaching -- even some publications -- abound with anecdotal evidence. Our intuition often supplants a systematic, scientific approach to finding out what works and what doesn't work. Yet, research is increasingly demonstrating that our gut feelings about teaching are often wrong. In this talk I will discuss some research my group has done on gender issues in science courses and on the effectiveness of classroom demonstrations.

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