Julie Schell

Innovative flipped classrooms, at Texas Woman's University (Denton, TX), Tuesday, March 5, 2013:
Simply putting lectures online is one way to flip a class, but it is not the best way. In this workshop, Dr. Julie Schell will introduce two practical strategies teachers can use to design learning environments that boost student engagement with subject-matter both in and outside of class. Attendees will experience live demonstrations of one flipped class technique called Peer Instruction, developed at Harvard University and backed by 20 years of research, that can be used in any discipline and with any class size. (1.5 hrs)
An introduction to the flipped classroom, at Texas Woman's University (Denton, TX), Monday, March 4, 2013:
Instructors all over the globe are turning their students' worlds around by flipping their classrooms. In a flipped class, teachers move information coverage out of the lecture hall so that they can better leverage in-class time to address student difficulties and misconceptions. In this interactive workshop, Dr. Julie Schell will introduce the flipped classroom technique, review its history, and confront and resolve big questions and myths about flipped teaching. Participants will observe a demo on how to create lecture videos and get tips on creating their own.
Flipping the classroom: How to turn your students' worlds right-side up , at Mount Royal University (Calgary, Alberta, Canada), Tuesday, February 5, 2013:
Instructors all over the globe are turning their students' worlds around by flipping their classrooms. In a flipped class, teachers typically move information coverage out of the lecture hall so that they can better leverage in-class time to address student difficulties and misconceptions. In this workshop, Dr. Julie Schell will introduce the flipped classroom technique, review its history, and present two practical strategies teachers can use to design learning environments that facilitate student engagement with subject-matter both in and outside of class. Attendees will experience live... Read more about Flipping the classroom: How to turn your students' worlds right-side up 
Flipping the STEM classroom: How to turn your students' worlds right-side up , at Mount Royal University (Calgary, Alberta, Canada), Tuesday, February 5, 2013:
STEM faculty all over the globe are turning their students' worlds around by flipping their classrooms. In a flipped class, teachers typically move information coverage out of the lecture hall so that they can better leverage in-class time to address student difficulties and misconceptions about STEM subject matter. Some teachers are even flipping laboratories.  In this workshop, Dr. Julie Schell will introduce the flipped classroom technique, review its history, and present two practical strategies teachers can use to design learning environments that facilitate student engagement with... Read more about Flipping the STEM classroom: How to turn your students' worlds right-side up 
Flipping the Math classroom: How to turn your students' worlds right-side up , at New Jersey City University (Jersey City, NJ), Friday, February 1, 2013:
Instructors all over the globe are turning their students' worlds around by flipping their classrooms. In a flipped class, teachers typically move information coverage out of the lecture hall so that they can better leverage in-class time to address student difficulties and misconceptions. In this three hour workshop, Dr. Julie Schell will introduce the basic flipped classroom technique, review its history, and present two practical flipped teaching methods teachers can use to design learning environments that facilitate student engagement with mathematical subject-matter both in and outside... Read more about Flipping the Math classroom: How to turn your students' worlds right-side up 
Catalyzing Learner Engagement Using Cutting-Edge Classroom Response Systems in Higher Education, at 2013 International HETL Conference, University of Central Florida (Orlando, FL), Tuesday, January 15, 2013:
In this presentation, we introduce a cutting-edge technology for enacting and measuring learner engagement in novel ways. We will open by problematizing traditional approaches to learner engagement and offer a research-based solution in a new classroom response system developed at Harvard University—Learning Catalytics. The presentation will include an overview of key cognitive science principles tied to research on how students learn best. We will link those principles with the functionality of Learning Catalytics to connect learning theory to teaching practice. We will then provide an... Read more about Catalyzing Learner Engagement Using Cutting-Edge Classroom Response Systems in Higher Education
Using pedagogical innovation to improve student success in first-year courses, at 2013 International HETL Conference, University of Central Florida (Orlando, FL, USA), Monday, January 14, 2013:
Student retention is a higher education problem that penetrates diverse contexts, including institutional types, subject matter, and geographic region. Theories have historically linked increased retention rates to concepts such as campus involvement and institutional engagement (Tinto, 1993). Most higher education retention interventions thus focus on keeping students who are already at university, enrolled. Attrition is at its highest at the end of the first year of study (Tinto, 1993). One reason students drop out at this stage is because they are struggling academically in large,... Read more about Using pedagogical innovation to improve student success in first-year courses
Assessment: The Secret to Great Teaching, at Webinar Series on Strategies for Innovation in Engineering Education in Brazil, LASPAU-Affiliated with Harvard University (Cambridge, MA), Sunday, December 2, 2012:
Open the doors to any classroom across the globe and you will observe an almost universal model for the evaluation of student learning. Instructors stand at the front of a lecture hall, teach content, students (at least we hope) attempt to learn that content, and then instructors evaluate that content learning through traditional assessments such as multiple-choice exams, quizzes, or research papers. Most of these conventional approaches to evaluation are one-dimensional and not aligned with overarching learning goals that relate to competencies students actually need to progress successfully... Read more about Assessment: The Secret to Great Teaching

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