education

Innovating Education to Educate Innovators, at AAC&U Transforming Undergraduate STEM Education Conference (Boston, MA), Thursday, November 3, 2016:
Can we teach innovation? Innovation requires whole-brain thinking — right-brain thinking for creativity and imagination, and left-brain thinking for planning and execution. The prevalent approach to education in science and technology focuses on the transfer of information, developing mostly right-brain thinking by stressing copying and reproducing existing ideas rather than generating new ones. I will show how focusing in class on questioning and promoting social interaction leads to deeper learning and independent thinking. I will also present a new approach to get every student to... Read more about Innovating Education to Educate Innovators
Assessment: The silent killer of learning, at Science Week Lecture, University of Texas Arlington (Arlington, TX), Tuesday, November 1, 2016:
Why is it that stellar students sometimes fail in the workplace while dropouts succeed? One reason is that most, if not all, of our current assessment practices are inauthentic. Just as the lecture focuses on the delivery of information to students, so does assessment often focus on having students regurgitate that same information back to the instructor. Consequently, assessment fails to focus on the skills that are relevant in life in the 21st century. Assessment has been called the "hidden curriculum" as it is an important driver of students' study habits. Unless we rethink our approach to... Read more about Assessment: The silent killer of learning
Turning Lectures into Learning, at Turning Technologies User Conference (Leiden, Netherlands), Wednesday, October 26, 2016:
The world is abuzz with talk about "clickers" or classroom response systems. Clicker are not just simple polling tools, but can be used to achieve significant learning gains. In this presentation we explore using clickers with Peer Instruction, a pedagogy that encourages students to interact and solve problems during class.
Turning Lectures into Learning, at Turning Technologies User Conference (London, UK), Monday, October 24, 2016:
The world is abuzz with talk about "clickers" or classroom response systems. Clicker are not just simple polling tools, but can be used to achieve significant learning gains. In this presentation we explore using clickers with Peer Instruction, a pedagogy that encourages students to interact and solve problems during class.
Confessions of a converted lecturer, at Enhancing Teaching Effectiveness, Nyack College (Nyack, NY), Friday, October 21, 2016:
I thought I was a good teacher until I discovered my students were just memorizing information rather than learning to understand the material. Who was to blame? The students? The material? I will explain how I came to the agonizing conclusion that the culprit was neither of these. It was my teaching that caused students to fail! I will show how I have adjusted my approach to teaching and how it has improved my students' performance significantly
Assessment: The silent killer of learning, at Enhancing Teaching Effectiveness, Nyack College (Nyack, NY), Friday, October 21, 2016:
Why is it that stellar students sometimes fail in the workplace while dropouts succeed? One reason is that most, if not all, of our current assessment practices are inauthentic. Just as the lecture focuses on the delivery of information to students, so does assessment often focus on having students regurgitate that same information back to the instructor. Consequently, assessment fails to focus on the skills that are relevant in life in the 21st century. Assessment has been called the "hidden curriculum" as it is an important driver of students' study habits. Unless we rethink our approach to... Read more about Assessment: The silent killer of learning
Assessment: The silent killer of learning, at College of Science Distinguished Speaker, Rochester Institute to Technology (Rochester, NY), Monday, October 17, 2016:
Why is it that stellar students sometimes fail in the workplace while dropouts succeed? One reason is that most, if not all, of our current assessment practices are inauthentic. Just as the lecture focuses on the delivery of information to students, so does assessment often focus on having students regurgitate that same information back to the instructor. Consequently, assessment fails to focus on the skills that are relevant in life in the 21st century. Assessment has been called the "hidden curriculum" as it is an important driver of students' study habits. Unless we rethink our approach to... Read more about Assessment: The silent killer of learning
Collaborative Knowledge Construction using an Online Annotation System, at 2016 International Conference of East-Asian Association for Science Education (Tokyo, Japan), Friday, August 26, 2016
We studied the collaborative construction of knowledge facilitated by an online annotation system in a flipped class. Students used the online system to collaboratively annotate the pre-class reading assignments by asking questions, responding to questions, or placing comments. The annotation threads reveal the students’ knowledge structures. For example, asking questions (or answering them) exposes lack of knowledge or misconceptions that persist after the pre-class reading. At the same time, even just reading annotation threads without contributing to them can help spread knowledge.... Read more about Collaborative Knowledge Construction using an Online Annotation System
Flat space, deep learning, at Yale-NUS College (Singapore), Tuesday, August 23, 2016:
The teaching of physics to engineering students has remained stagnant for close to a century. In this novel team-based, project-based approach, we break the mold by giving students ownership of their learning. This new course has no standard lectures or exams, yet students’ conceptual gains are significantly greater than those obtained in traditional courses. The course blends six best practices to deliver a learning experience that helps students develop important skills, including communication, estimation, problem solving, and team skills, in addition to a solid conceptual understanding... Read more about Flat space, deep learning
Confessions of a converted lecturer, at Yale-NUS College (Singapore), Monday, August 22, 2016:
I thought I was a good teacher until I discovered my students were just memorizing information rather than learning to understand the material. Who was to blame? The students? The material? I will explain how I came to the agonizing conclusion that the culprit was neither of these. It was my teaching that caused students to fail! I will show how I have adjusted my approach to teaching and how it has improved my students' performance significantly

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