2004

Visualizations and visual illusions: how the mind tricks us, at Lowell Regional Physics Alliance Meeting, University of Massachusetts Lowell (Lowell, MA), Thursday, November 18, 2004:
Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning.
Supercontinuum and second harmonic generation in amorphous silica nanowires, at Glass & Optical Materials Division Fall 2004 Meeting (Cocoa Beach, FL), Wednesday, November 10, 2004:
We developed a technique for drawing long, free-standing silica nanowires with diameters down to 50 nm and lengths up to 40 mm. The wire core is amorphous and of very uniform diameter. The wire surface has atomic level smoothness. The wire can guide a single mode of visible or near-infrared light. Because the diameter of the fiber is smaller than the wavelength, however, a large portion of the guided light is in the form of an evanescent field surrounding the nanowire. When amplified femtosecond laser pulses are coupled into these wires, surprising nonlinear optical effects are observed: in... Read more about Supercontinuum and second harmonic generation in amorphous silica nanowires
Morphology and optical properties of femtosecond irradiated glass with variable pulse repetition rates, at Glass & Optical Materials Division Fall 2004 Meeting (Cocoa Beach, FL), Tuesday, November 9, 2004:
We investigated the morphology of femtosecond irradiated borosilicate glass with respected to two variables: the number of shots and the laser repetition rate. For the laser repetition rate we have covered the range from 250 kHz to 25 MHz. We identify two distinct regimes of femtosecond processing in the kHz to MHz range. As the time interval between pulses is reduced, we observe a transition from a repetitive modification process (identical to what is frequently called multiple shot damage) to a cumulative thermal mechanism. In the repetitive regime, each pulse acts independently and the... Read more about Morphology and optical properties of femtosecond irradiated glass with variable pulse repetition rates
Raman studies of micro-machine glasses with variable repetition rates, at GOMD Fall Meeting 2004 (Cocoa beach, FL), Tuesday, November 9, 2004:
Structural changes in borosilicate and fused silica glasses modified by a femtosecond laser at different laser repetition rates were investigated. The sample was submitted to femtosecond laser pulses at a rate ranging from 1 kHz to 25 MHz in the regime where the sample could experience from a rapid cooling to a cumulative heating respectively. Changes in the glass networks of the modified region were recorded via Raman microscopy using an Ar laser at 514 nm as an excitation. Due to fluorescence background in fused silica, relative peak intensities at 605 cm-1 800 cm-1 were observed for... Read more about Raman studies of micro-machine glasses with variable repetition rates
Femtosecond laser micromachining of glass for photonics applications, at Glass & Optical Materials Division Fall 2004 Meeting (Cape Canaveral, FL), Monday, November 8, 2004:
When femtosecond laser pulses are focused tightly into a transparent material, the intensity in the focal volume can become high enough to cause nonlinear absorption of laser energy. The absorption, in turn, can lead to permanent structural or chemical changes. Such changes can be used for micromachining bulk transparent materials. Applications include data storage and the writing of waveguides and waveguide splitters in bulk glass, fabrication of micromechanical devices in polymers, and subcellular photodisruption inside single cells. In this talk we will review recent results obtained in... Read more about Femtosecond laser micromachining of glass for photonics applications
Peer Instruction: Discussion and brains-on demonstration, at 2004 New Faculty Workshop, American Center for Physics (College Park, MD), Friday, November 5, 2004:
The basic goals of Peer Instruction are to encourage and make use of student interaction during lectures, while focusing students' attention on underlying concepts and techniques. The method has been assessed in many studies using standardized, diagnostic tests and shown to be considerably more effective than the conventional lecture approach to teaching. Peer Instruction is now used in a wide range of science and math courses at the college and secondary level. In this workshop, participants will learn about Peer Instruction, serve as the “class” in which Peer Instruction is demonstrated,... Read more about Peer Instruction: Discussion and brains-on demonstration
Active learning and interactive lectures, at 2004 New Faculty Workshop, American Center for Physics (College Park, MD), Friday, November 5, 2004:
Education is more than just transfer of information, yet that is what is mostly done in large introductory courses -- instructors present material (even though this material might be readily available in printed form) and for students the main purpose of lectures is to take down as many notes as they can. Few students have the ability, motivation, and discipline to synthesize all the information delivered to them. Yet synthesis is perhaps the most important -- and most elusive -- aspect of education. I will show how shifting the focus in lectures from delivering information to synthesizing... Read more about Active learning and interactive lectures
Visualizations and visual illusions: how the mind tricks us, at OSA Optics in the South East Conference, University of North Carolina Charlotte (Charlotte, NC), Thursday, November 4, 2004:
Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning.
Active Learning and Interactive Lectures Part I: Confessions of a converted lecturer, at CERTI Faculty Workshop, University of Missouri-Rolla (Rolla, MO), Friday, October 22, 2004:
I thought I was a good teacher until I discovered my students were just memorizing information rather than learning to understand the material. Who was to blame? The students? The material? I will explain how I came to the agonizing conclusion that the culprit was neither of these. It was my teaching that caused students to fail! I will show how I have adjusted my approach to teaching and how it has improved my students' performance significantly.
What Campus Leadership Can Do to Improve Student Learning, at CERTI’s Leadership Luncheon Series Comments, University of Missouri-Rolla (Rolla, MO), Friday, October 22, 2004
We are pleased to present Eric Mazur as our special guest speaker at CERTI’s Leadership Luncheon Series for October. We hope you can join your colleagues in this informative dialog as Eric expounds on the significance of leadership’s role in the learning process.

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