Other education

Multidimensional Measurement in Education, at Harvard Physics Research Scholar Retreat (Charlestown, MA), Friday, October 18, 2013:
Many of the Mazur Group Education research projects focus on measurement. Four areas of current interest to the group are learning, metacognition, interaction, and self-efficacy. This talk outlines some of our projects that measure interaction between students in and out of the classroom.
Barriers to reform, at Physics Brown Bag Seminar, University of Colorado (Boulder, CO), Wednesday, April 21, 2004
Talk of changing the way we educate students is nothing new. Maxwell wrote in his letters about students failing to learn. Socrates said we should teach by questioning, not telling. Yet, changing the way we teach seems to be more difficult than moving a mountain. One of the main reasons may be that we misinterpret the signals students send us.
Flat space, deep learning, at BLC Webinar (Cambridge, MA), Friday, April 11, 2014:
The teaching of physics to engineering students has remained stagnant for close to a century. In this novel team-based, project-based approach, we break the mold by giving students ownership of their learning. This new course has no standard lectures or exams, yet students’ conceptual gains are significantly greater than those obtained in traditional courses. The course blends six best practices to deliver a learning experience that helps students develop important skills, including communication, estimation, problem solving, and team skills, in addition to a solid conceptual understanding... Read more about Flat space, deep learning
Teaching Physics, Conservation Laws First, at Siam Physics Congress 2015 (Krabi, Thailand), Thursday, May 21, 2015:
The Principles and Practice of Physics is a groundbreaking new calculus-based introductory physics textbook that uses a unique organization and pedagogy to allow students to develop a true conceptual understanding of physics alongside the quantitative skills needed in the course. The book organizes introductory physics around the conservation principles and provides a unified contemporary view of introductory physics. In this talk we will discuss the unique architecture of the book, the conservation-laws-first approach, and results obtained with this book.
The make-believe world of real-world physics, at Teaching and Learning Center Public Lecture, Stanford University (Palo Alto, CA), Thursday, October 30, 2008:
That physics describes the real world is a given for physicists. In spite of tireless efforts by instructors to connect physics to the real world, students walk away from physics courses believing physicists live in a world of their own. Are students clueless about the real world? Or are we perhaps deluding ourselves and misleading our students about the real world?
Teaching Physics, Conservation Laws First, at Workshop for New Physics and Astronomy Faculty (College Park, MD), Thursday, November 19, 2015:
The Principles and Practice of Physics is a groundbreaking new calculus-based introductory physics textbook that uses a unique organization and pedagogy to allow students to develop a true conceptual understanding of physics alongside the quantitative skills needed in the course. The book organizes introductory physics around the conservation principles and provides a unified contemporary view of introductory physics. In this talk we will discuss the unique architecture of the book, the conservation-laws-first approach, and results obtained with this book.
The make-believe world of real-world physics, at Spring 2010 Meeting of the Chicago Section of the American Association of Physics Teachers, Chicago State University (Chicago, IL), Saturday, April 24, 2010:
That physics describes the real world is a given for physicists. In spite of tireless efforts by instructors to connect physics to the real world, students walk away from physics courses believing physicists live in a world of their own. Are students clueless about the real world? Or are we perhaps deluding ourselves and misleading our students about the real world?
Flat space, deep learning, at Monash University and Monash College (Melbourne, Australia), Thursday, August 18, 2016:
The teaching of physics to engineering students has remained stagnant for close to a century. In this novel team-based, project-based approach, we break the mold by giving students ownership of their learning. This new course has no standard lectures or exams, yet students’ conceptual gains are significantly greater than those obtained in traditional courses. The course blends six best practices to deliver a learning experience that helps students develop important skills, including communication, estimation, problem solving, and team skills, in addition to a solid conceptual understanding... Read more about Flat space, deep learning
Crafting learning goals using Backward Design: A hands-on workshop, at Center for Teaching and Learning, University of Texas, Austin (Austin, Texas, USA), Wednesday, November 17, 2010
In this workshop we will go through the process of developing effective learning goals using the non-conventional approach of Backward Design (Wiggins and McTighe). After taking this workshop, new or experienced instructors and instructional developers will be able to identify best practices for preparing effective learning goals and revise a set of more traditional learning goals based on those best practices.
Assessment: Part 1 -- The silent killer of learning, at North Dakota State University (Fargo, ND), Wednesday, April 5, 2017
Why is it that stellar students sometimes fail in the workplace while dropouts succeed? One reason is that most, if not all, of our current assessment practices are inauthentic. Just as the lecture focuses on the delivery of information to students, so does assessment often focus on having students regurgitate that same information back to the instructor. Consequently, assessment fails to focus on the skills that are relevant in life in the 21st century. Assessment has been called the "hidden curriculum" as it is an important driver of students' study habits. Unless we rethink our approach to... Read more about Assessment: Part 1 -- The silent killer of learning
Authentic Student Learning Evaluation Plans in Higher Education, at Seminario Internacional: Metodologías Activas y Evaluación de Aprendizaje, MECESUP (Santiago, Chile), Monday, July 18, 2011
Open the doors to any classroom across the globe and you will observe an almost universal model for the evaluation of student learning. Instructors stand at the front of a lecture hall, teach content, students (at least we hope) attempt to learn that content, and then instructors evaluate that content learning through traditional assessments such as multiple-choice exams, quizzes, or research papers. Most of these conventional approaches to evaluation are one-dimensional and are not aligned with overarching learning goals that relate to competencies students actually need to progress... Read more about Authentic Student Learning Evaluation Plans in Higher Education
The scientific approach to teaching: Research as a basis for course design, at Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM) (Johor Bahru, Malaysia), Friday, March 30, 2012:
Discussions of teaching -- even some publications -- abound with anecdotal evidence. Our intuition often supplants a systematic, scientific approach to finding out what works and what doesn't work. Yet, research is increasingly demonstrating that our gut feelings about teaching are often wrong. In this talk I will discuss some research my group has done on gender issues in science courses and on the effectiveness of classroom demonstrations.
Rethinking student learning evaluation in higher education, at Strengthening Teaching and Learning in STEM Fields: Uruguay, LASPAU-Harvard University (Cambridge, MA, USA), Friday, June 22, 2012:
Open the doors to any classroom across the globe and you will observe an almost universal model for the evaluation of student learning. Instructors stand at the front of a lecture hall, teach content, students (at least we hope) attempt to learn that content, and then instructors evaluate that content learning through traditional assessments such as multiple-choice exams, quizzes, or research papers. Most of these conventional approaches to evaluation are one-dimensional and not aligned with overarching learning goals that relate to competencies students actually need to progress successfully... Read more about Rethinking student learning evaluation in higher education

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