Other education

Rethinking student learning evaluation in higher education, at Strengthening Teaching and Learning in STEM Fields: Uruguay, LASPAU-Harvard University (Cambridge, MA, USA), Friday, June 22, 2012:
Open the doors to any classroom across the globe and you will observe an almost universal model for the evaluation of student learning. Instructors stand at the front of a lecture hall, teach content, students (at least we hope) attempt to learn that content, and then instructors evaluate that content learning through traditional assessments such as multiple-choice exams, quizzes, or research papers. Most of these conventional approaches to evaluation are one-dimensional and not aligned with overarching learning goals that relate to competencies students actually need to progress successfully... Read more about Rethinking student learning evaluation in higher education
Flat space, deep learning, at Independent Schools Association of the Southwest (ISAS) Conference (Tulsa, OK), Monday, November 3, 2014:
The teaching of physics to engineering students has remained stagnant for close to a century. In this novel team-based, project-based approach, we break the mold by giving students ownership of their learning. This new course has no standard lectures or exams, yet students’ conceptual gains are significantly greater than those obtained in traditional courses. The course blends six best practices to deliver a learning experience that helps students develop important skills, including communication, estimation, problem solving, and team skills, in addition to a solid conceptual understanding... Read more about Flat space, deep learning
The scientific approach to teaching: Research as a basis for course design, at Department of Physics and Astronomy Seminar, Youngstown State University (Youngstown, OH), Thursday, September 27, 2012:
Discussions of teaching -- even some publications -- abound with anecdotal evidence. Our intuition often supplants a systematic, scientific approach to finding out what works and what doesn't work. Yet, research is increasingly demonstrating that our gut feelings about teaching are often wrong. In this talk I will discuss some research my group has done on gender issues in science courses and on the effectiveness of classroom demonstrations.
Flat space, deep learning, at Program on Peer Instruction, Singapore Polytechnic (Singapore), Tuesday, March 17, 2015:
The teaching of physics to engineering students has remained stagnant for close to a century. In this novel team-based, project-based approach, we break the mold by giving students ownership of their learning. This new course has no standard lectures or exams, yet students’ conceptual gains are significantly greater than those obtained in traditional courses. The course blends six best practices to deliver a learning experience that helps students develop important skills, including communication, estimation, problem solving, and team skills, in addition to a solid conceptual understanding... Read more about Flat space, deep learning
Flipped classrooms 101: An introduction to the flipped classroom, at CSM Faculty Development Workshops, Rowan University (Glassboro, NJ), Friday, April 12, 2013:
Instructors all over the globe are turning their students' worlds around by flipping their classrooms. In a flipped class, teachers move information coverage out of the lecture hall so that they can better leverage in-class time to address student difficulties and misconceptions. In this interactive session, Dr. Julie Schell will flip the workshop by providing brief introductory, pre-workshop activities to participants. During the workshop, she will discuss the why, what, and how of flipped classrooms by confronting and resolving a series of common myths about flipped teaching. Participants... Read more about Flipped classrooms 101: An introduction to the flipped classroom
Flipping the Classroom 101, at Flipped, Fast, and Flexible: New Pedagogies for the Age of Personalized Learning, Berkshire Community College (Pittsfield, MA), Wednesday, August 28, 2013
Instructors all over the globe are turning their students' worlds around by flipping their classrooms. In a flipped class, teachers move information coverage out of the lecture hall so that they can better leverage in-class time to address student difficulties and misconceptions. In this interactive workshop, Dr. Julie Schell will flip the session by providing brief introductory, pre-workshop activities to participants. She will use responses from these activities in the workshop and discuss the why, what, and how of flipped classrooms by confronting and resolving a series common myths about... Read more about Flipping the Classroom 101
Innovations that work in large physics courses: why and how?, at Astronomy Department Chairs Meeting, Harvard University (Cambridge, MA), Friday, June 15, 2001:
Education is more than just transfer of information, yet that is what is mostly done in large introductory courses -- instructors present material (even though this material might be readily available in printed form) and for students the main purpose of lectures is to take down as many notes as they can. Few students have the ability, motivation, and discipline to synthesize all the information delivered to them. Yet synthesis is perhaps the most important -- and most elusive -- aspect of education. Students get frustrated because they are unable to grasp simple concepts. Instructors get... Read more about Innovations that work in large physics courses: why and how?
Using Questions to Catalyze Learning: Question Design Workshop, at Weill Cornell Medical College (New York, NY), Thursday, February 20, 2014:
Questions are the heart of engaging students in any classroom. In this workshop, we will collaborate to discover the elements of effective questions. We will practice answering different question types as a large group via a classroom response system called Learning Catalytics and contrast that experience with other classroom response systems, such as flashcards and clickers. Finally, we will work individually and in pairs on a case study to learn promising practices for developing effective questions.
Visualizations and visual illusions: how the mind tricks us, at Center for Astrophysics Lecture, Harvard University (Cambridge, MA), Tuesday, January 11, 2005:
Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning.
The Principles and Practice of Physics, at Physics and Astronomy New Faculty Workshop (College Park, MD), Tuesday, June 24, 2014:
The Principles and Practice of Physics is a groundbreaking new calculus-based introductory physics textbook that uses a unique organization and pedagogy to allow students to develop a true conceptual understanding of physics alongside the quantitative skills needed in the course. The book organizes introductory physics around the conservation principles and provides a unified contemporary view of introductory physics. In this talk we will discuss the unique architecture of the book, the conservation-laws-first approach, and results obtained with this book.
How the mind tricks us: visualizations and visual illusions, at Phi Beta Kappa Public Lecture, University of Tennessee (Knoxville, TN), Thursday, April 3, 2008:
Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning
The Principles and Practice of Physics, at Webinar (Cambride, MA), Thursday, August 6, 2015:
The Principles and Practice of Physics is a groundbreaking new calculus-based introductory physics textbook that uses a unique organization and pedagogy to allow students to develop a true conceptual understanding of physics alongside the quantitative skills needed in the course. The book organizes introductory physics around the conservation principles and provides a unified contemporary view of introductory physics. In this talk we will discuss the unique architecture of the book, the conservation-laws-first approach, and results obtained with this book.
The make-believe world of real-world physics, at Public Lecture, Temple University (Philadelphia, PA), Monday, September 21, 2009:
That physics describes the real world is a given for physicists. In spite of tireless efforts by instructors to connect physics to the real world, students walk away from physics courses believing physicists live in a world of their own. Are students clueless about the real world? Or are we perhaps deluding ourselves and misleading our students about the real world?

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