Other education

Teaching Physics, Conservation Laws First, at Mastering Leadership Community Summit (Tucson, AZ), Thursday, February 16, 2017:
The Principles and Practice of Physics is a groundbreaking new calculus-based introductory physics textbook that uses a unique organization and pedagogy to allow students to develop a true conceptual understanding of physics alongside the quantitative skills needed in the course. The book organizes introductory physics around the conservation principles and provides a unified contemporary view of introductory physics. In this talk we will discuss the unique architecture of the book, the conservation-laws-first approach, and results obtained with this book.
The scientific approach to teaching: Research as a basis for course design, at Harvard Medical Education Grand Rounds, Harvard Medical School (Boston, MA), Friday, April 8, 2011:
Discussions of teaching -- even some publications -- abound with anecdotal evidence. Our intuition often supplants a systematic, scientific approach to finding out what works and what doesn't work. Yet, research is increasingly demonstrating that our gut feelings about teaching are often wrong. In this talk I will discuss some research my group has done on gender issues in science courses and on the effectiveness of classroom demonstrations.
Flipping your classroom for college readiness: Research-Based Strategies for your Classroom, at CRAFT Professional Development Institute, Hidalgo Independent School District (Hidalgo, TX, USA), Tuesday, August 21, 2012:
How can I help my students learn in ways that pique their interest and enrich their subject matter understanding? We will explore this perennial question by considering an innovative, research-based teaching method called Peer Instruction (PI). Originally developed by Dr. Eric Mazur to address major gaps in students' conceptual knowledge of physics at Harvard University, this interactive pedagogical method is now widely used by thousands of instructors across the world. PI leverages the power of social learning and the latest advances in cognitive science to confront students' misconceptions... Read more about Flipping your classroom for college readiness: Research-Based Strategies for your Classroom
The Principles and Practice of Physics, at Pearson Innovation Summit (Vancouver, BC, Canada), Friday, January 23, 2015:
The Principles and Practice of Physics is a groundbreaking new calculus-based introductory physics textbook that uses a unique organization and pedagogy to allow students to develop a true conceptual understanding of physics alongside the quantitative skills needed in the course. The book organizes introductory physics around the conservation principles and provides a unified contemporary view of introductory physics. In this talk we will discuss the unique architecture of the book, the conservation-laws-first approach, and results obtained with this book.
Using pedagogical innovation to improve student success in first-year courses, at 2013 International HETL Conference, University of Central Florida (Orlando, FL, USA), Monday, January 14, 2013:
Student retention is a higher education problem that penetrates diverse contexts, including institutional types, subject matter, and geographic region. Theories have historically linked increased retention rates to concepts such as campus involvement and institutional engagement (Tinto, 1993). Most higher education retention interventions thus focus on keeping students who are already at university, enrolled. Attrition is at its highest at the end of the first year of study (Tinto, 1993). One reason students drop out at this stage is because they are struggling academically in large,... Read more about Using pedagogical innovation to improve student success in first-year courses
Teaching Physics, Conservation Laws First, at Purdue University (West Lafayette, IN), Friday, April 10, 2015:
The Principles and Practice of Physics is a groundbreaking new calculus-based introductory physics textbook that uses a unique organization and pedagogy to allow students to develop a true conceptual understanding of physics alongside the quantitative skills needed in the course. The book organizes introductory physics around the conservation principles and provides a unified contemporary view of introductory physics. In this talk we will discuss the unique architecture of the book, the conservation-laws-first approach, and results obtained with this book.
Confusion: Students' Perception vs. Reality, at American Association of Physics Teachers Winter 2000 Meeting (Kissimmee, FL), Tuesday, January 18, 2000:
Should an instructor be discouraged when students say ""I'm confused""? This is a crucial issue for educational reform, because students often report feeling more confused when they are asked to think more for themselves. We report on an analysis of the relationship between perceived confusion and understanding in introductory physics. We asked 200 students during one semester to indicate what, if anything, they found difficult or confusing in their pre-class reading assignment and correlated their responses to answers they provided on questions on corresponding topics. Preliminary results... Read more about Confusion: Students' Perception vs. Reality
Assessment: The Silent Killer of Learning, at Dudley Herschbach Teacher/Scientist lecture, Harvard University (Cambridge, MA), Tuesday, October 29, 2013:
Why is it that stellar students sometimes fail in the workplace while dropouts succeed? One reason is that most, if not all, of our current assessment practices are inauthentic. Just as the lecture focuses on the delivery of information to students, so does assessment often focus on having students regurgitate that same information back to the instructor. Consequently, assessment fails to focus on the skills that are relevant in life in the 21st century. Assessment has been called the "hidden curriculum" as it is an important driver of students' study habits. Unless we rethink our approach to... Read more about Assessment: The Silent Killer of Learning
The scientific approach to teaching: research as a basis for course design, at ATLAS/GTP Roundtable Discussion, University of Colorado (Boulder, CO), Thursday, April 22, 2004
Discussions of teaching -- even some publications -- abound with anecdotal evidence. Our intuition often supplants a systematic, scientific approach to finding out what works and what doesn't. Yet, research is increasingly demonstrating that our gut feelings about teaching are often wrong. In this talk I will discuss some research my group has done on gender issues in science courses and on the effectiveness of classroom demonstrations.
The Principles and Practice of Physics, at University of Texas at Arlington (Arlington, TX), Friday, April 25, 2014:
The Principles and Practice of Physics is a groundbreaking new calculus-based introductory physics textbook that uses a unique organization and pedagogy to allow students to develop a true conceptual understanding of physics alongside the quantitative skills needed in the course. The book organizes introductory physics around the conservation principles and provides a unified contemporary view of introductory physics. In this talk we will discuss the unique architecture of the book, the conservation-laws-first approach, and results obtained with this book.
How the mind tricks us: visualizations and visual illusions, at Course on Frontier Developments in Optics and Spectroscopy, Centro Ettore Majorana (Erice, Italy), Monday, June 25, 2007:
Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning
Flat space, deep learning, at Institute for Teaching and Learning Innovation Public Lecture Series, University of Queensland (Brisbane, Australia), Monday, June 1, 2015:
The teaching of physics to engineering students has remained stagnant for close to a century. In this novel team-based, project-based approach, we break the mold by giving students ownership of their learning. This new course has no standard lectures or exams, yet students’ conceptual gains are significantly greater than those obtained in traditional courses. The course blends six best practices to deliver a learning experience that helps students develop important skills, including communication, estimation, problem solving, and team skills, in addition to a solid conceptual understanding... Read more about Flat space, deep learning
How the mind tricks us: visualizations and visual illusions, at Seminario Internacional sobre la Enseñanza y Aprendizaje Efectivo, Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez (Santiago, Chile), Tuesday, January 20, 2009:
Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning

Pages