Other education

Teaching Physics, Conservation Laws First, at John Abbott College (Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue QC, Canada), Tuesday, May 5, 2015:
The Principles and Practice of Physics is a groundbreaking new calculus-based introductory physics textbook that uses a unique organization and pedagogy to allow students to develop a true conceptual understanding of physics alongside the quantitative skills needed in the course. The book organizes introductory physics around the conservation principles and provides a unified contemporary view of introductory physics. In this talk we will discuss the unique architecture of the book, the conservation-laws-first approach, and results obtained with this book.
The scientific approach to teaching: Research as a basis for course design, at Teaching and Learning Committee Lunch Talk, Pomona College (Claremont, CA), Monday, April 14, 2008:
Discussions of teaching -- even some publications -- abound with anecdotal evidence. Our intuition often supplants a systematic, scientific approach to finding out what works and what doesn't work. Yet, research is increasingly demonstrating that our gut feelings about teaching are often wrong. In this talk I will discuss some research my group has done on gender issues in science courses and on the effectiveness of classroom demonstrations.
Flat space, deep learning, at Fall 2015 Meeting of the NCS-AAPT, Davidson College (Davidson, NC), Friday, October 16, 2015:
The teaching of physics to engineering students has remained stagnant for close to a century. In this novel team-based, project-based approach, we break the mold by giving students ownership of their learning. This new course has no standard lectures or exams, yet students’ conceptual gains are significantly greater than those obtained in traditional courses. The course blends six best practices to deliver a learning experience that helps students develop important skills, including communication, estimation, problem solving, and team skills, in addition to a solid conceptual understanding... Read more about Flat space, deep learning
Venturing toward better teaching: Professors' knowledge base for pedagogical improvement in introductory STEM classrooms at major research universities., at The Association for The Study of Higher Education Annual Meeting (Vancouver, BC, Canada), Thursday, November 5, 2009
Educational reformers often portray the majority of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) professors at American research universities as subject-matter experts but pedagogical novices (Baldwin, 2009; Boyer, 1998; Coopala, 2009; Handeslman et al., 2006; Wieman, 2006). Images of STEM professors as lacking knowledge about best teaching practices are especially prevalent in discussions about academic researchers: A wide array of constituents, from students and journalists to scholars of teaching and learning, have long proffered views of academic researchers as so heavily... Read more about Venturing toward better teaching: Professors' knowledge base for pedagogical improvement in introductory STEM classrooms at major research universities.
Flat space, deep learning, at Physics Colloquium, Harvard University (Cambridge, MA), Monday, March 28, 2016:
The teaching of physics to engineering students has remained stagnant for close to a century. In this novel team-based, project-based approach, we break the mold by giving students ownership of their learning. This new course has no standard lectures or exams, yet students’ conceptual gains are significantly greater than those obtained in traditional courses. The course blends six best practices to deliver a learning experience that helps students develop important skills, including communication, estimation, problem solving, and team skills, in addition to a solid conceptual understanding... Read more about Flat space, deep learning
Why teaching problem solving is a problem, at 2010 Science and Technology in Society Forum (Kyoto, Japan), Sunday, October 3, 2010:
Of all the skills that are important in life in general and science, math and engineering education I n particular, the one that is most generally considered to be the most important one is problem solving. But what is problem solving? Problem solving is the process of moving toward a goal when the path to that goal is uncertain. The traditional approach to education largely fails to teach real problem solving. What can we do to address this problem?
Getting every student ready for every class, at Kent State University (Kent, OH), Friday, February 24, 2017:
Over the past decades there has been a concerted push away from passive lecturing to active engagement in the classroom. A successful implementation of the so-called flipped classroom requires students to come to class prepared, either by reading the textbook or watching a pre-recorded video. A variety approaches have been devised to get students to take responsibility for this information transfer, but none manage to get all students to participate, compromising the in-class activities. I will present a new approach to get every student to prepare for every class using a new social learning... Read more about Getting every student ready for every class
Using goal-based instructional design to frame innovative learning experiences, at Renovacion Pedagogica 2011, Universidad Del Norte (Barranquilla, Colombia), Friday, June 10, 2011:
Instructors are at their core, learning designers. Most begin drawing their plans for student learning using a traditional approach, considering: Which text book and readings should I use? Which topics should I cover? How should I test my students’ knowledge? Advances in learning science suggest turning this traditional approach to course planning upside down and design student learning experiences by first asking a set of different questions: What exactly do I want my students to be able to do after they take this course? What are the learning goals I have for... Read more about Using goal-based instructional design to frame innovative learning experiences
Why improve STEM teaching?, at Fulbright WHA Junior Visiting Faculty Development Institute, University of Texas at Austin (Austin, TX), Wednesday, January 25, 2012:
Scientists discover the world that exists; engineers create the world that never was." This quote from Theodore von Kármán reflects the complexity and challenges scientists and engineers face. In their endeavors to discover and create, as educators they face the critical need to better prepare future scientists and engineers to innovate in our increasingly high-technology society. Schools and universities across the globe are working to attract students to STEM programs and to design learning environments that will help ensure student success. Industry requires knowledge experts who possess... Read more about Why improve STEM teaching?
Anatomy of a College Readiness Assignment, at CRAFT Professional Development Institute, University of Texas at Austin (Austin, TX), Monday, June 25, 2012:
The College Readiness Assignment Field-Test (CRAFT) project is working to disseminate standalone lessons designed by expert educators to prepare students for college-level success. In this presentation will discuss the heart of the CRAFT project: college readiness assignments (CRAs). We will dissect CRAs and demonstrate how the various parts map to state standards.
Assessment: The silent killer of learning, at Public Lecture, ETH Zurich (Zurich, Switzerland), Thursday, November 27, 2014:
Why is it that stellar students sometimes fail in the workplace while dropouts succeed? One reason is that most, if not all, of our current assessment practices are inauthentic. Just as the lecture focuses on the delivery of information to students, so does assessment often focus on having students regurgitate that same information back to the instructor. Consequently, assessment fails to focus on the skills that are relevant in life in the 21st century. Assessment has been called the "hidden curriculum" as it is an important driver of students' study habits. Unless we rethink our approach to... Read more about Assessment: The silent killer of learning
Accelerating Academic Achievement at the University, at University of Texas at Austin (Austin, TX), Thursday, August 23, 2012:
Improving student success is one of the most pressing issues in higher education across the world. Too often, despite succeeding in secondary classrooms, students enter college underprepared to engage in the rigors of undergraduate study, which results in a number of consequences for institutions. High dropout, failure, and withdrawal rates limit students’ abilities to take full advantage of their college experience and reach their highest potential. Failing to intervene has substantial cost implications for institutions, instructors, and societies within which an educated workforce is key... Read more about Accelerating Academic Achievement at the University
The Principles and Practice of Physics, at University of Florida (Gainesville, FL), Monday, February 16, 2015:
The Principles and Practice of Physics is a groundbreaking new calculus-based introductory physics textbook that uses a unique organization and pedagogy to allow students to develop a true conceptual understanding of physics alongside the quantitative skills needed in the course. The book organizes introductory physics around the conservation principles and provides a unified contemporary view of introductory physics. In this talk we will discuss the unique architecture of the book, the conservation-laws-first approach, and results obtained with this book.
Using Partnerships to Scale Innovation: UT-Austin’s OnRamps Initiative, at TASA Midwinter Conference (Austin, TX), Wednesday, January 30, 2013:
OnRamps is a statewide initiative organized by UT-Austin to accelerate students’ preparation for entry-level college courses. Three dual-credit courses are being developed by faculty at UT- Austin and other institutions for launch in fall 2013. This session focuses on how OnRamps has used strategic partnerships— with national experts, institutional and technological partners, and successful programs—to leverage expertise, as well as scale and support statewide innovation.
Flat space, deep learning, at NES APS Spring Meeting, Boston Univeristy (Boston, MA), Friday, April 24, 2015:
The teaching of physics to engineering students has remained stagnant for close to a century. In this novel team-based, project-based approach, we break the mold by giving students ownership of their learning. This new course has no standard lectures or exams, yet students’ conceptual gains are significantly greater than those obtained in traditional courses. The course blends six best practices to deliver a learning experience that helps students develop important skills, including communication, estimation, problem solving, and team skills, in addition to a solid conceptual understanding... Read more about Flat space, deep learning

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