Other education

Flat space, deep learning, at Purdue University (West Lafayette, IN), Friday, April 10, 2015:
The teaching of physics to engineering students has remained stagnant for close to a century. In this novel team-based, project-based approach, we break the mold by giving students ownership of their learning. This new course has no standard lectures or exams, yet students’ conceptual gains are significantly greater than those obtained in traditional courses. The course blends six best practices to deliver a learning experience that helps students develop important skills, including communication, estimation, problem solving, and team skills, in addition to a solid conceptual understanding... Read more about Flat space, deep learning
Evidence-Based Instructional Strategies that Improve College Student Success, at CSSP Technical Assistance Workshop for the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, University of Houston (Houston, TX), Thursday, May 30, 2013
One day workshop on increasing the use of evidence-based pedagogies to improve student success in postsecondary education in Texas over three sessions. Session 1 provided interactive training on Flipped Classrooms, Just-in-Time Teaching and Peer Instruction. Session 2, a working session featuring a case study of evidence-based instructional strategies at scale; Session 3, an instructional hack-a-thon to identify barriers and invent clever solutions to increasing faculty adoption of innovative teaching methods at individual institutions.
Factors That Make Peer Instruction Work: A 700-User Survey, at 2000 AAPT Winter Meeting (Kissimmee, FL), Tuesday, January 18, 2000:
Peer Instruction, a teaching strategy in which lectures are interspersed with short, conceptual questions (""ConcepTests""), is used widely in introductory physics and other classes at the college and secondary school levels. Although anecdotal evidence suggests that many instructors achieve success, there has been no previous systematic study of the factors contributing to the effectiveness of Peer Instruction. We administered a comprehensive survey of nearly 700 Peer Instruction users worldwide, gathering data on implementation and outcomes in a wide variety of settings and institutions. We... Read more about Factors That Make Peer Instruction Work: A 700-User Survey
Flipped Classrooms 101—An Introduction to Flipped Learning, at Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Southwestern University (Georgetown, TX), Friday, October 25, 2013:
Instructors all over the globe are turning their students' worlds around by flipping their classrooms. In a flipped class, teachers move information coverage out of the lecture hall so that they can better leverage in-class time to address student difficulties and misconceptions. In this interactive session, Dr. Julie Schell will flip the workshop by providing brief introductory, pre-workshop activities to participants. She will use responses from these activities in the workshop and discuss the why, what, and how of flipped classrooms by confronting and resolving a series common myths about... Read more about Flipped Classrooms 101—An Introduction to Flipped Learning
Using technology to facilitate learning in large lecture classes, at University of Colorado (Boulder, CO), Thursday, April 22, 2004:
It has been suggested the lack of interaction in large lecture courses is to blame for the many problems facing these courses: declining enrollments, low attendance, poor evaluations, and disappointing retention. We offer a way of redesigning the classroom so interaction is introduced in many aspects of the course. This approach has shown to be effective by many instructors in a broad variety of environments. I will demonstrate some of the tools we have developed to foster this interaction.
The Principles and Practice of Physics, at Physics Department Seminar, University of Central Florida (Orlando, FL), Friday, April 18, 2014:
The Principles and Practice of Physics is a groundbreaking new calculus-based introductory physics textbook that uses a unique organization and pedagogy to allow students to develop a true conceptual understanding of physics alongside the quantitative skills needed in the course. The book organizes introductory physics around the conservation principles and provides a unified contemporary view of introductory physics. In this talk we will discuss the unique architecture of the book, the conservation-laws-first approach, and results obtained with this book.
How the mind tricks us: visualizations and visual illusions, at International Conference on Technology in Collegiate Mathematics, Westin Copley Plaza (Boston, MA), Friday, February 16, 2007:
Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning
Teaching Physics, Conservation Laws First, at Institute for Teaching and Learning Innovation Public Lecture Series, University of Queensland (Brisbane, Australia), Monday, June 1, 2015:
The Principles and Practice of Physics is a groundbreaking new calculus-based introductory physics textbook that uses a unique organization and pedagogy to allow students to develop a true conceptual understanding of physics alongside the quantitative skills needed in the course. The book organizes introductory physics around the conservation principles and provides a unified contemporary view of introductory physics. In this talk we will discuss the unique architecture of the book, the conservation-laws-first approach, and results obtained with this book.
The scientific approach to teaching: Research as a basis for course design, at Seminario Internacional sobre la Enseñanza y Aprendizaje Efectivo, Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez (Santiago, Chile), Monday, January 19, 2009:
Discussions of teaching -- even some publications -- abound with anecdotal evidence. Our intuition often supplants a systematic, scientific approach to finding out what works and what doesn't work. Yet, research is increasingly demonstrating that our gut feelings about teaching are often wrong. In this talk I will discuss some research my group has done on gender issues in science courses and on the effectiveness of classroom demonstrations.
Flat space, deep learning, at 1st Leiden University Conference on Educational Innovation, Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Leiden, Netherlands), Monday, November 23, 2015:
The teaching of physics to engineering students has remained stagnant for close to a century. In this novel team-based, project-based approach, we break the mold by giving students ownership of their learning. This new course has no standard lectures or exams, yet students’ conceptual gains are significantly greater than those obtained in traditional courses. The course blends six best practices to deliver a learning experience that helps students develop important skills, including communication, estimation, problem solving, and team skills, in addition to a solid conceptual understanding... Read more about Flat space, deep learning
The make-believe world of real-world physics, at Public Lecture, University of Iowa (Iowa City, IA), Thursday, April 29, 2010:
That physics describes the real world is a given for physicists. In spite of tireless efforts by instructors to connect physics to the real world, students walk away from physics courses believing physicists live in a world of their own. Are students clueless about the real world? Or are we perhaps deluding ourselves and misleading our students about the real world?
Flat space, deep learning, at Yale-NUS College (Singapore), Tuesday, August 23, 2016:
The teaching of physics to engineering students has remained stagnant for close to a century. In this novel team-based, project-based approach, we break the mold by giving students ownership of their learning. This new course has no standard lectures or exams, yet students’ conceptual gains are significantly greater than those obtained in traditional courses. The course blends six best practices to deliver a learning experience that helps students develop important skills, including communication, estimation, problem solving, and team skills, in addition to a solid conceptual understanding... Read more about Flat space, deep learning
An Evaluation of Effectiveness of Short Physics Workshops for In-service Teachers, at American Association of Physics Teachers Winter Meeting 2011 (Jacksonville, FL), Monday, January 10, 2011
There is compelling evidence that Peer Instruction improves students’ ability to complete both conceptual and traditional computational physics problems. We used Peer Instruction during a four-week long (120 hours) retraining course for in-service teachers of grades 7-12 in Korea. The goal of this study is to investigate if Peer Instruction can be used to improve the participating teachers’ conceptual understanding of introductory physics concepts. To this end we pre- and post-tested the teachers using the Force Concept Inventory and The Conceptual Survey of Electricity and Magnetism.... Read more about An Evaluation of Effectiveness of Short Physics Workshops for In-service Teachers
Assessment: The silent killer of learning, at Stanford University (Palo Alto, CA), Friday, May 12, 2017:
Why is it that stellar students sometimes fail in the workplace while dropouts succeed? One reason is that most, if not all, of our current assessment practices are inauthentic. Just as the lecture focuses on the delivery of information to students, so does assessment often focus on having students regurgitate that same information back to the instructor. Consequently, assessment fails to focus on the skills that are relevant in life in the 21st century. Assessment has been called the "hidden curriculum" as it is an important driver of students' study habits. Unless we rethink our approach to... Read more about Assessment: The silent killer of learning
Pedagogía scientífica, at Seminario Internacional: Metodologías Activas y Evaluación de Aprendizaje (Santiago, Chile), Wednesday, July 20, 2011:
Discussions of teaching -- even some publications -- abound with anecdotal evidence. Our intuition often supplants a systematic, scientific approach to finding out what works and what doesn't work. Yet, research is increasingly demonstrating that our gut feelings about teaching are often wrong. In this talk I will discuss some research my group has done on gender issues in science courses and on the effectiveness of classroom demonstrations.

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