Femtosecond laser microfabrication

We study the interaction of intense, femtosecond laser pulses with bulk transparent materials and use this interaction for material modification. The intensity of a femtosecond laser pulse can be high enough to cause nonlinear interactions between a transparent medium and the laser field. The material can strongly absorb energy from the laser field, producing free electrons in the material. This absorption can lead to damage or refractive index changes in the irradiated sample. The nature of the interaction between the laser pulse and the material depends on how the laser pulse is focused. When a powerful femtosecond laser pulse is tightly focused into a transparent sample, nonlinear absorption occurs only in the very small focal volume. This localization allows us to create patterns in three-dimensions inside transparent samples such as glass. For example, we have observed structures as small as 200-nm in diameter, offering exciting possibilities for high-precision microstructuring of transparent solids and for minimally disruptive laser nanosurgery.
Laser induced microexplosions: Ultrafast physics with clinical applications, at Chemical Center Seminar, Lund University (Lund, Sweden), Monday, May 22, 2000:
Recently there has been much interest in using femtosecond laser pulses in surgical applications. For example, femtosecond lasers could replace the nanosecond systems currently used for opthalmic photodisruption, providing improved surgical precision and adding versatility. In surgical applications, it is the high intensity of femtosecond laser pulses that is exploited. By tightly focusing these short pulses, the intensity becomes high enough to cause nonlinear absorption inside a transparent material (such as the vitreous humor). The absorption produces a hot plasma inside the sample that is... Read more about Laser induced microexplosions: Ultrafast physics with clinical applications
Femtosecond laser micromachining of transparent materials for photonics and biology, at International Symposium on Photonic Glasses 2002 (Shanghai, China), Tuesday, October 15, 2002:
When femtosecond laser pulses are focused tightly into a transparent material, the intensity in the focal volume can become high enough to cause nonlinear absorption of laser energy. The absorption, in turn, can lead to permanent structural or chemical changes. Such changes can be used for micromachining bulk transparent materials. Applications include data storage and the writing of waveguides and waveguide splitters in bulk glass, fabrication of micromechanical devices in polymers, and subcellular photodisruption inside single cells. In this talk we will review recent results obtained in... Read more about Femtosecond laser micromachining of transparent materials for photonics and biology
Femtosecond Laser Micromachining: Applications in Technology and Biology, at Joint University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University Colloquium, Carnegie Mellon University (Pittsburgh, PA), Monday, April 5, 2004:
When femtosecond laser pulses are focused tightly into a transparent material, the intensity in the focal volume can become high enough to cause nonlinear absorption of laser energy. The absorption, in turn, can lead to permanent structural or chemical changes. Such changes can be used for micromachining bulk transparent materials. Applications include data storage and the writing of waveguides and waveguide splitters in bulk glass, fabrication of micromechanical devices in polymers, and subcellular photodisruption inside single cells. In this talk we will review recent results obtained in... Read more about Femtosecond Laser Micromachining: Applications in Technology and Biology
Femtosecond laser micromachining, at Photonics West 2006 (San Jose, CA), Tuesday, January 24, 2006:
When femtosecond laser pulses are focused tightly into a transparent material, the intensity in the focal volume can become high enough to cause nonlinear absorption of laser energy. The absorption, in turn, can lead to permanent structural or chemical changes. Such changes can be used for micromachining bulk transparent materials. Applications include data storage and the writing of waveguides and waveguide splitters in bulk glass, fabrication of micromechanical devices in polymers, and subcellular photodisruption inside single cells.
Femtosecond laser micromachining, at Physics Majors and ATE Student Seminar, UPR Humacao (Humacao, PR), Thursday, February 18, 2010:
When femtosecond laser pulses are focused tightly into a transparent material, the intensity in the focal volume can become high enough to cause nonlinear absorption of laser energy. The absorption, in turn, can lead to permanent structural or chemical changes. Such changes can be used for micromachining bulk transparent materials. Applications include data storage and the writing of waveguides and waveguide splitters in bulk glass, fabrication of micromechanical devices in polymers, and subcellular photodisruption inside single cells.
Laser-induced microexplosions: creating stellar conditions on an optical bench, at Joint SPIE and Department of Electrical and Electrical Engineering Seminar, The University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong, Hong Kong), Saturday, October 23, 1999:
Using femtosecond laser pulses we study the effects of intense laser radiation on transparent materials. By tightly focusing these laser pulses below the surface of transparent materials, we initiate highly nonlinear absorption processes which produce a dense, highly-excited plasma inside the sample. The high density, tightly-confined plasma leads to a micron-sized explosion within the material, with temperatures and pressures approaching stellar conditions. We have recently shown that it is possible to create internal submicron-sized structures by optically initiating microexplosions inside... Read more about Laser-induced microexplosions: creating stellar conditions on an optical bench
Femtosecond laser micromaching in the conjugated polymer MEH-PPV, at E-MRS Spring Meeting (Strasbourg, France), Thursday, May 31, 2007:
Femtosecond-laser micromachining of poly[2-methoxy-5-(2’-ethylhexyloxy)-p-phenylene vinylene] (MEH-PPV) films is investigated using 130-fs pulses at 800-nm from a laser oscillator operating at 76-MHz repetition rate. We investigate the effect of pulse energy and translation speed on the depth and morphology of the micromachined regions. We quantified the MEH-PPV photobleaching induced by the fs-laser, and the conditions in which the emission of MEH-PPV is preserved after the micromaching.
Manipulating Matter with Ultrashort Laser Pulses, at Wednesday Night Research Seminar, Harvard University (Cambridge, MA), Wednesday, November 9, 2011:
When femtosecond laser pulses are focused tightly into a transparent material, the intensity in the focal volume can become high enough to cause nonlinear absorption of laser energy. The absorption, in turn, can lead to permanent structural or chemical changes. Such changes can be used for micromachining bulk transparent materials. Applications include data storage and the writing of waveguides and waveguide splitters in bulk glass, fabrication of micromechanical devices in polymers, and subcellular photodisruption inside single cells. In this talk we will review recent results obtained in... Read more about Manipulating Matter with Ultrashort Laser Pulses
Femtosecond Materials Processing I: Transparent and soft materials, at Tsing Hua Univeristy (Beijing, China), Wednesday, December 17, 2014:
The intersection of materials research and ultrafast optical science is producing many valuable fundamental scientific results and applications, and the trend is expected to evolve as new and exciting discoveries are made. Femtosecond laser micromachining presents unique capabilities for three-dimensional, material-independent, sub-wavelength processing. At the same time the surface processing of materials permits the creation of novel materials that cannot (yet) be created under other conditions. In the first part of this talk we will discuss how when the ultashort laser pulses are focused... Read more about Femtosecond Materials Processing I: Transparent and soft materials

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