Other education

 Liderando la Innovación en la Educación Superior en la República Dominicana: The Cycle of Innovation in The Dominican Republic, at Encuentro para la mejora e innovación en la enseñanza en República Dominicana (Santo Domingo, República Dominicana), Tuesday, April 17, 2012:
In this workshop, we demonstrate the cycle of innovation for teaching and learning improvement in Dominican higher education, resulting from a year-long initiative sponsored by Ministerio de Educación Superior, Ciencia y Tecnología (MESCYT) y la Fundación INICIA.
The scientific approach to teaching: Research as a basis for course design, at Curso de Innovación en la Enseñanza y el Aprendizaje, Universidad de los Andes (Santiago, Chile), Thursday, August 23, 2012:
Discussions of teaching -- even some publications -- abound with anecdotal evidence. Our intuition often supplants a systematic, scientific approach to finding out what works and what doesn't work. Yet, research is increasingly demonstrating that our gut feelings about teaching are often wrong. In this talk I will discuss some research my group has done on gender issues in science courses and on the effectiveness of classroom demonstrations.
The Principles and Practice of Physics, at Webinar (Cambride, MA), Monday, February 9, 2015:
The Principles and Practice of Physics is a groundbreaking new calculus-based introductory physics textbook that uses a unique organization and pedagogy to allow students to develop a true conceptual understanding of physics alongside the quantitative skills needed in the course. The book organizes introductory physics around the conservation principles and provides a unified contemporary view of introductory physics. In this talk we will discuss the unique architecture of the book, the conservation-laws-first approach, and results obtained with this book.
The scientific approach to teaching: Research as a basis for course design, at Physics Colloquium, Boston University (Boston, MA), Tuesday, January 22, 2013:
Discussions of teaching -- even some publications -- abound with anecdotal evidence. Our intuition often supplants a systematic, scientific approach to finding out what works and what doesn't work. Yet, research is increasingly demonstrating that our gut feelings about teaching are often wrong. In this talk I will discuss some research my group has done on gender issues in science courses and on the effectiveness of classroom demonstrations.
Flat space, deep learning, at Interface 2015, University of Florida (Gainesville, FL), Friday, April 24, 2015:
The teaching of physics to engineering students has remained stagnant for close to a century. In this novel team-based, project-based approach, we break the mold by giving students ownership of their learning. This new course has no standard lectures or exams, yet students’ conceptual gains are significantly greater than those obtained in traditional courses. The course blends six best practices to deliver a learning experience that helps students develop important skills, including communication, estimation, problem solving, and team skills, in addition to a solid conceptual understanding... Read more about Flat space, deep learning
Why you can pass tests and still fail in the real world, at 2013 9th Annual International CDIO Conference, Harvard University (Cambridge, MA), Wednesday, June 12, 2013:
Why is it that stellar students sometimes fail in the workplace while dropouts succeed? One reason is that most, if not all, of our current assessment practices are inauthentic. Just as the lecture focuses on the delivery of information to students, so does assessment often focus on having students regurgitate that same information back to the instructor. Consequently, assessment fails to focus on the skills that are relevant in life in the 21st century. Assessment has been called the "hidden curriculum" as it is an important driver of students' study habits. Unless we rethink our approach to... Read more about Why you can pass tests and still fail in the real world
Rubrics Workshop, at OnRamps Fall Professional Development Seminar, The University of Texas at Austin (Austin, TX), Monday, December 9, 2013:
Rubrics are powerful tools that can help prepare students for postsecondary success. In this workshop, we will use rubric exercises to simulate the academic behaviors and work habits rubrics can promote. We will also review six ways rubrics can go beyond scoring guides to personalize feedback, make students' practice more efficient, encourage scholarly engagement, and help students monitor their own learning and progress.
Visualizations and visual illusions: how the mind tricks us, at University of Colorado (Boulder, CO), Friday, April 23, 2004:
Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning.
Visualizations and visual illusions: how the mind tricks us, at 2006 Cottrell Scholars Meeting (Tucson, AZ), Friday, July 7, 2006:
Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning.
Teaching Physics, Conservation Laws First, at Vanier College (Montreal, QC, Canada), Tuesday, May 5, 2015:
The Principles and Practice of Physics is a groundbreaking new calculus-based introductory physics textbook that uses a unique organization and pedagogy to allow students to develop a true conceptual understanding of physics alongside the quantitative skills needed in the course. The book organizes introductory physics around the conservation principles and provides a unified contemporary view of introductory physics. In this talk we will discuss the unique architecture of the book, the conservation-laws-first approach, and results obtained with this book.
How the mind tricks us: visualizations and visual illusions, at Phi Beta Kappa Public Lecture, Yale University (New Haven, CT), Wednesday, April 23, 2008:
Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning
Teaching Physics, Conservation Laws First, at Wake Forest University (Winston-Salem, NC), Friday, October 16, 2015:
The Principles and Practice of Physics is a groundbreaking new calculus-based introductory physics textbook that uses a unique organization and pedagogy to allow students to develop a true conceptual understanding of physics alongside the quantitative skills needed in the course. The book organizes introductory physics around the conservation principles and provides a unified contemporary view of introductory physics. In this talk we will discuss the unique architecture of the book, the conservation-laws-first approach, and results obtained with this book.
How the mind tricks us: visualizations and visual illusions, at Jefferson Lab Science Series, Jefferson Laboratory (Newport News, VA), Wednesday, December 9, 2009:
Neurobiology and cognitive psychology have made great progress in understanding how the mind processes information – in particular visual information. The knowledge we can gain from these fields has important implications for the presentation of visual information and student learning
Teaching Physics, Conservation Laws First, at Webinar (Cambridge, MA), Wednesday, March 30, 2016:
The Principles and Practice of Physics is a groundbreaking new calculus-based introductory physics textbook that uses a unique organization and pedagogy to allow students to develop a true conceptual understanding of physics alongside the quantitative skills needed in the course. The book organizes introductory physics around the conservation principles and provides a unified contemporary view of introductory physics. In this talk we will discuss the unique architecture of the book, the conservation-laws-first approach, and results obtained with this book.

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